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UrtheCast Camera Footage from the ISS

UrtheCast, a satellite imaging startup, operates two massive Iris cameras mounted on the International Space Station to capture pretty incredible footage. Objects a meter in size are visible, and software compensates for the movement of the ISS above Earth. The company, which plans to sell its video and data to companies and the government, has promised to stream live video from its cameras to the public next month.

Show and Tell: Testing Camera Slider Gear

For today's Show and Tell, Joey and Norm give you a behind-the-scenes look at some of the camera gear we use to film Tested videos. Specifically, camera sliders and motorized mounts that we use in the studio at on location. We've been testing the Redrock Micro One Man Crew motorized slider, which you may have seen used in previous Show and Tell videos!

Google Play App Roundup: CloudPlayer, Xenowerk, and Geometry Wars 3

Money doesn't grow on trees, and those $0.99 app purchases do add up. It's best to go into the Play Store with some idea of what's up your alley and what isn't. That's what the Google Play App Roundup is here to do. We bring you the best new and newly updated app and games every week. Just click on the app name to head to the Play Store and test it out yourself.

CloudPlayer

There are a dozen different subscription music services, but what if you've already got a large music library and you don't want to mess around with something new? CloudPlayer from doubleTwist can turn your existing cloud storage accounts into a handy online music library.

CloudPlayer works with Google Drive, Dropbox, and OneDrive. Simply dump your music (supports all major formats including lossless) into whichever cloud account you have with sufficient storage, and log into it via the CloudPlayer app. The first indexing will take a while, especially if you have a lot of music. Once you've got everything ready to go, the app acts very much like other music players.

You can see all of your music filtered in various ways by opening the navigation drawer on the left. It has quick links for artist, album, song, playlists, and so on. CloudPlayer pulls down artist images automatically and shows everything in a card layout. Starting playback seems very quick with my Dropbox test account and WiFi/LTE, but that will vary based on your connection. There's also an option to cache songs offline so you can listen without a connection.

When listening to music via the app, there's a persistent playback bar at the bottom that brings up the Now Playing screen. You get the album art, playback controls, and everything else you'd expect from a music app. I will note that the way you drag up to see the full queue is really neat, though. There's also a built-in 10-band EQ that's accessible from the Now Playing screen.

One of my favorite parts of the app is its built-in Google Cast and AirPlay support. Just hit the cast button on the main screen to select a device on your local network and send audio there. This has been working very well for me and really makes the app a viable alternative to Play Music.

My only real concern with the way CloudPlayer works is that it scans the entire online storage directory. There's no way I can see to point it to a specific folder. So if you've got audio files in your Dropbox (or whatever service) that you don't want showing up in CloudPlayer, you'll have to move them elsewhere.

Cloud Player is free to try for 7 days, but after that it costs $4.99 to buy the full version of the app.

LEGO with Friends: Carl Merriam, Part 1

For this week's LEGO with Friends series, we're joined by a very special guest: LEGO product designer Carl Merriam! Carl, who we first met at a local LEGO convention, is visiting all the way from Denmark, where he works on the LEGO Minecraft team. We chat with him about what it's like working at LEGO and how these sets are designed. It's going to be an awesome week! (The first episode is free for everyone, but the rest of the series will be for Premium Members.)

Meet the Modular Prosthetic Limb

This realistic robot arm and hand was one of the coolest things we saw at the DARPA Robotics Challenge event--it's a technology that's already being field tested on patients. We chat with Michael McLoughlin, Chief Engineer at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab to learn more about the challenges of building a modular prosthetic limb that has the same dexterity as a human hand, and its potential applications.

DARPA Robotics Challenge: Team IHMC's Atlas Robot

The DARPA Robotics Challenge challenged teams with designing and teaching robots to complete an obstacle course simulating a disaster relief scenario--a task more difficult than it sounds. We chat with Doug Steven of the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition to learn how the IHMC team has programmed a Boston Dynamics Atlas robot to tackle the competition.

Building a District 9 Alien Rifle Replica, Part 2

Over the course of this month, Punished Props' Bill Doran is building a 1:1 scale replica of the alien assault rifle from District 9 to unveil with us at Comic-Con. Bill's build logs and videos will walk through his design and fabrication process, and his finished piece will be paired with a surprise at SDCC. Place your questions for Bill in the comments below!

Welcome to the second installment of the District 9 rifle prop build! The project is moving along at a good pace and I've made a lot of progress. While the main body of the gun was made mostly in flat layers, there are a bunch of cylindrical pieces and it would be a pain to build them from flat sheets of material. Instead, I opted to bust out my lathe.

Working with Foam

For these pieces, I used a urethane tooling foam called RenShape. It comes in several densities. I ended up using the most dense foam I had. This stuff is so dense that you would think it's made of rock.

I was also made aware by my pal Harrison Krix that sometimes this kind of foam could cause curing inhibition in platinum cure silicones, so I performed a simple test. I took a small sample of each of the four densities I had on hand and dumped silicone over them all. Sure enough, the two least dense foams caused some inhibition, while the two most dense ones did not. Hence the decision to use the most dense stuff!