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Tested's Walking Tour of DesignerCon 2015

DesignerCon is an annual gathering of sculptors, illustrators, and toy makers who bring their latest projects and works to fans. It's like the artists-alley of every major comic book convention put together! Frank and Norm give a walking tour of the show and talk about the culture of designer toys and collectible pop art. Keep an eye out for some really creative designs!

Google Play App Roundup: Audify, Horizon Chase, and Call of Champions

If you're going to be supporting app development on Android (and you should), you might as well pay for the best content you can. That's what the Google Play App Roundup is all about. This is where you can come every week to find out what's new and cool on Android. Just follow the links to the Play Store.


Android's notification system is great… when you're looking at the phone. But what happens when your attention is focused elsewhere? A beep and flashing light only provides so much information. With Audify, you can have your notifications read aloud, and unlike some similar services and apps, this isn't just for messaging. Audify can read all your notifications.

Audify should work on any phone running Android 4.3 or higher. That's because it needs the notification listener, which you'll be prompted to enable upon opening the app for the first time. This lets Audify read the text of the notification, which it then runs through the standard text-to-speech engine on your phone. It's not going to be like having a conversation with a human, but the default voice on most phones isn't bad anymore. It's like a very polite female robot.

There are multiple settings to control how and when Audify activates. Once you set these rules, you don't have to fiddle with the app at all. The default behavior is to start Audify when you plug in headphones or connect a Bluetooth audio device. This implies that you're not going to be looking at the screen and it might be advantageous to have your notifications read to you. There's also a setting to only read when the screen is off. Again, this is probably the most likely use case. However, you can have the audio go through the speakers and work all the time, even when the screen is awake. It's your call.

Audify will read all high-priority notifications (the ones that trigger alert sounds). If an app isn't important enough that you want the notifications read aloud, no problem. Just add it to the muted list. Audify will smartly ignore repeated notifications from the same app in a short period of time too.

Some people will be annoyed by the active notification in the shade when Audify is active. I don't think there's anyway to get around that, though. If you want the app to work, it needs a foreground notification to remain alive. You can give Audify a shot for free with 250 notifications. After that, you have to buy the full version for $0.99. You can also get 100 more free notifications by referring a friend.

Watch All of Tested: The Show 2015!

Here it is. Tested: The Show 2015 in its entirety. Watch the full hour and forty five minute stage show we put on at the Bay Area Science Festival last month, from Michael Shindler's amazing tintype demonstration to Adam's Talking Room interview with NASA Deputy Administrator Dava Newman. The individual videos will be up on YouTube, but Tested Premium Members get to watch it early!

Episode 327 - Hero with a Thousand Faces - 11/19/15
How do you stream your music and video from today's services? This week, Norm, Jeremy, and Patrick discuss data encryption, the fall of Rdio, tablet displays, and the endurance of Star Wars! Also, we mull over Oxford Dictionaries word of the year selections and share what we've been testing. Apologies for the video going out in the last five minutes--an office munchkin pushed our mixer buttons!
00:00:00 / 02:10:18
Bits to Atoms: Designing the 3D Printed Gowanus Monster

Prowling Brooklyn's polluted Gowanus Canal, the Monster sinks innocent kayakers and grabs unaware hipsters, pulling them down into the depths. The Gowanus Monster was a commission I did for Bold Machines, a product development workshop headed by Bre Pettis, one of the founders and former CEO of MakerBot. The Monster was done as one in a series of proof of concept characters for an animation, all of which can be downloaded for free. This is how I created it.

Sean's 3D-Printed Gowanus Monster

Bold Machines was very interested in my Octopod design and tasked me with designing another submarine to fit their storyline. Initially they wanted to add some local flavor and referenced the Quester I, a homemade sub built in the 1960's by a Brooklyn shipyard worker. A local legend that never did launch and is currently marooned in the middle of Coney Island Creek. They were also really interested in having some type of tentacles for grabbing ships. I was not getting much design inspiration from the Quester I, but tried to stick to a small craft and took some inspiration from lampreys. Mechanical arms would fold back into the body, springing open to grab ships or treasure.

Version 1 with Quester I and lamprey inspirations

They liked it, but wanted something more like the Octopod--in fact, they wanted the Octopod, but I wasn't ready to let go of my baby and it would have needed a tremendous amount of work to print on an FDM machine. Going back to the drawing board, I decided to create something that would be found in the same fleet as the Octopod and based it on a fellow cephalopod--the cuttlefish.

A Pocket History of Space Electronics (from Tested: The Show!)

Meet Megan Prelinger, a cultural historian, archivist of 20th century ephemera, and the co-founder of the wonderful Prelinger Library in San Francisco. Megan has written books about the history of the space race the electronic age through the unique lens of commercial art and advertising. At our live show, Megan shared with us a pocket history of space electronics! (Promo photo courtesy of Dallis Willard.)