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In Brief: NASA Releases Library of Space Sounds for Public Use

Earlier this month, NASA posted to SoundCloud a large library of audio clips from its history of space endeavors. These aren't just vocal bytes from ground control or astronauts--they include the sounds of rocket launches, landings, and spacecraft exploring our solar system. The beeping of Sputnik and the chorus of radio waves in the Earth's atmosphere can now be downloaded and mixed into your own productions. Archive.org has 222 NASA public domain audio clips as well!

Norman
Color Grading Breakdown for a Beauty Commercial

Joey shared this awesome video with us yesterday, a time-lapse screen capture of post-production colorist < ahref="http://www.colormeup.de/">Andreas Bruekcl's work on a L'Oreal beauty commercial. The three-minute clip shows about 30 minutes of realtime grading of video shot with on an Arri Alexa, and gives just a taste of the incredibly complex task of tweaking colors and lighting of video for production. It's far more complex than the developing of RAW photos in Lightroom, for example, because the colorist has to mask and track moving elements for video. Something to keep in mind: this is a process that almost every shot of every produced live-action commercial, television show, and film goes through today, to some extent.

In Brief: The Making of Danny DeVito's Penguin Makeup for Batman Returns

The Stan Winston school has posted an excerpt from the book "The Winston Effect", chronicling the design and application of Danny DeVito's iconic Penguin makeup for Batman Returns. For the Tim Burton film--which won Winston and collaborators Ve Neill and Ronnie Specter Oscar nominations--DeVito's makeup needed to capture the the director's creepy aesthetic and the essence of the villain. Behind-the-scenes art shows the various concept sketches for Penguin's look (and especially his nose), as well as the application of the prosthetics and paint for filming. DeVito apparently also asked that the makeup be put during voice-over ADR session for Batman Returns, to get back into character. Awesome stuff!

Norman
The Creature and Portrait Sculptures of Mike Hill

We visit the workshop of Mike Hill, a renowned portrait sculptor who specializes in recreating the classic horror monsters of Hollywood (and the actors who embodied them). Mike's full-body sculptures of characters like Frankenstein's Monster, the Wolf Man, and even Christopher Reeve's Superman are startlingly lifelike. We chat with Mike about his process, look at a work-in-progress, discuss what he tries to achieve with his portraits.

Everything You Should Know About Android 5.0 Lollipop

Google took the unprecedented step of offering an early developer preview of Android L (now Android 5.0 Lollipop) last spring. We knew this version of Android was going to be a big shift, something for which developers would need to plan. However, it wasn't until the recent official announcement that it became clear how massive this change would be. Android 5.0 is a break from the past, and in many ways a complete reinvention of the platform.

Here's what you need to know about Android 5.0, the most significant update the platform has ever seen. It's enough to change what most people think of Google's mobile operating system, and I'm really excited about it.

Bye-bye battery woes

If you can recall one of the long-time complaints about Android, it's very possible Android 5.0 addresses it. For example, don't you hate how Android phones always seem to have questionable battery life unless they're equipped with a huge battery? Well, no more. Lollipop is supposed to improve battery life noticeably.

I've been testing the latest developer preview of Android Lollipop, which is API-complete according to Google. Both the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 are managing at least a third more battery life than before. This is thanks to Google's so-called Project Volta, an initiative in Android 5.0 to address those nagging battery life concerns. Granted, this is not the final version of Lollipop, but the difference is astounding.

A major component of the battery life improvements have to do with a better system of managing background processes. Android does multitasking by permitting any app to wake the phone and keep it awake so it can perform an action. In the event of an error or incompatibility, these "wakelocks" can last too long and drain the battery. I tend to follow the sleep stats of my devices closely because I have to install so many apps on a daily basis. Android 5.0 appears to keep things running incredibly smoothly. When devices are in sleep mode, the processor is in deep sleep (i.e. not wakelocked) about 90% of the time. Absolutely amazing.

Android 5.0 also includes an approximation of remaining battery life in the settings and on the lock screen when charging. After letting the Nexus 7 calibrate for a few cycles, it reports a full week of standby time, and I believe it. In the event you do run low on battery life, there's a new system-level battery saver mode that disables animations, background data, vibration, and lowers the screen brightness.

Chris Hadfield Explains His Space Photography Techniques

Adam tweeted this link to a great Q&A with Chris Hadfield from the Dark Sky star gazing festival happening right now at Canada's Jasper National Park. The former astronaut spoke a bit about Earth-gazing, and explains in this video how astronaut take advantage of the micro-gravity environment on the ISS to steady and position their cameras to photograph long-exposures of the Earth. No tripods needed in low Earth orbit!

In Brief: Amazon Announces Fire TV Streaming HDMI Stick

Amazon today announced the Fire TV Stick, an HDMI streaming stick with the capability of Amazon's $100 Fire TV set-top box. The $40 stick is positioned against Google's Chromecast and Roku's Streaming Stick, and Amazon is boasting its technical specs. It runs off of a dual-core Broadcom A9-based SoC, has 1GB of RAM, and 8GB of internal flash storage--higher than Google and Roku's options. Dual-antenna MIMO Wi-Fi may also give it a leg up in homes with spotty wireless connections. Of course, it's software and the video player platform that matters the most, and we didn't find Amazon's Fire TV to be more compelling than the Chromecast or Roku. You don't get access to Fire TV's voice search feature, either, unless you spring for the $30 Fire TV remote. Amazon is also promising HBO Go support by the end of the year. We'll be testing the Fire TV Stick and comparing it with the the Chomecast and Roku Streaming Stick early next month, but Amazon has discounted the launch price to $20 if you're a Prime subscriber, through Wednesday. I also believe that if you sign up for a 30-day trial of Prime, you would also be eligible for this discount.

Norman
Google Play App Roundup: Inbox, République, and Deep Loot

A new week has dawned, but you can ease the transition with some new apps and games. You've come to the right place, too. This is the Google Play App Roundup, the weekly feature where we tell you what's new and cool in Google Play.Just hit the links to zoom right to the Play Store.

This week email is changing again, they are watching, and there's treasure to be found.

Inbox

There is no denying that Gmail completely changed the way we think about using email, but that was all the way back in 2004. It's about time for Google to take another shot at improving email communication, and Inbox is it. Google has been working on Inbox behind the scenes for a while now under the codename Bigtop. This service plugs into your Gmail account and applies many of the features and algorithms used in Google Now to make your email less about when messages arrive and more about what they mean.

Inbox is based around bundles, or types of messages that fall into general categories. If you use the Gmail categories that were added last year, this is a similar idea, but much more expansive. For example, you've got a bundle for purchases where all the messages you receive that look like receipts will end up. Maybe a meeting invitation will produce a handy calendar reminder with Inbox. When emails come in, you can open the thread from your main inbox view, but something in a bundle opens the full bundle as a timeline (today, yesterday, etc). Using Inbox is definitely an adjustment--there's no doubt about that.

All your labels from Gmail are there, but they are of secondary importance in Inbox. The bundles can't really be altered as they're looking for specific things in your email to categorize. Inbox also pulls out relevant information in a very Google Now sort of way. For example, you could get tracking information for a package right in the main inbox screen. You can add conversations to any of the bundles, though. Anything you think is particularly important, be it bundled or not, can be pinned in the app. Those pinned messages and reminders can be accessed by toggling the pin switch at the top of the app.

Managing your email with Inbox is also atypical of a traditional email app. You can't delete anything with Inbox. Instead, it has options to mark things as done or snooze them. Done is essentially the equivalent of archiving in regular Gmail, but triggered with a swipe to the right. It basically treats emails as tasks. You can also snooze an email with a swipe to the left. That will present options to have it reappear at the top of Inbox at a certain time.

The app itself is very in-line with Google's new material design aesthetic. There's a floating action button for composing new messages, the slide-out nav menu, and plenty of bold colors. On Lollipop devices, it also has the full hero color up top for the status bar and app switcher header (but not in the dev preview build). Interestingly, some of the Android L animations are missing from the buttons.

Inbox is currently invite only, but Google is handing out quite a few now and all current users have three invites each. I feel like Inbox could make a lot of sense for those who don't get a ton of email or who haven't worked to organize their mail already. If you've already got a system of labels and actions in place to deal with a large volume of email, Inbox would be more of an adjustment.

Show and Tell: Quicksilver's Stereobelt Replica

For this week's Show and Tell, Norm visits our 3D printing expert Sean Charlesworth in New York to learn about a prop replica project. Sean has faithfully recreated Qucksilver's "Stereobelt" from the most recent X-men movie, a prop that is actually based on a little-known portable cassette player that predated Sony's Walkman. A little bit of A/V technology history, rapid prototyping, and obsessing over film props--everything we love! (More details about this project here.)