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Tested Lessons: Painting Model Kits, Part 5

Work on painting the Monterpappa creature kit continues! Will and Norm learn how to layer washes on the model to give it a natural-looking base color, start working on some of the details. These are starting to look pretty good! We also chat about recent summer movies, like Avengers: Age of Ultron. Follow along with us by signing up for a Tested Premium Membership here, and post your painting questions in the comments.

The Talking Room: Adam Savage Interviews Astro Teller

Adam Savage welcomes Astro Teller to The Talking Room! Astro is Google's 'Captain of Moonshots', directing the Google X lab where self-driving cars, smart contact lenses, and other futuristic projects are conceived and made real. Adam sat down with Astro at the Tested Live Show this past October to chat about the benefits of thinking big and failing quickly.

Testing: Asus ZenFone 2 Smartphone

In the United States, on-contract subsidies for phones is slowly being supplanted by leasing and "easy-pay" deals where users can get new phones for no money down--the full price of the phone is amortized over the term of the contract. It's another way that carriers are trying to hide the fact that the latest flagship phones are more expensive than most people think--$600 and up in the bottom line. That's why we take note when phones like the Nexus 5 and OnePlus One are released for half that price, off-contract and unlocked for use with any GSM carrier. The latest of these low-cost high-end phones is Asus' ZenFone 2, which I've been using for the past few weeks. Its recent US release turned heads because of its price: $200 for a 1080p phone with really good technical specs. Sounds great on paper, and I'm happy to report that there aren't many catches (at least not any you can't work around).

The Asus ZenFone 2 is also interesting because it runs on an Intel Atom processor. The quad-core SoC is on the top end of Intel's Silvermont architecture, paired with a PowerVR graphics component. It's actually the same chip found in the Dell Venue 8 7000 tablet I tested at the beginning of the year, which was a great performer. As with the Dell tablet, you shouldn't have to worry about Android app compatibility with X86--Android Lollipop's ART runtime takes care of that. And running on a 1080p smartphone, the performance of the chip is competitive with the latest ARM SoCs from Qualcomm and Samsung. My benchmarks showed it fitting between the performance of the Galaxy S6 and LG G4--definitely flagship material. At that level, I couldn't notice performance differences in day to day use, even in gaming.

I should mention that the ZenFone 2 does come at two price points, with meaningful differences. The $200 entry-level runs a slightly slower 1.8GHz processor, with 2GB of RAM and 16GB of storage. The $300 model I tested has a 2.33GHz Atom, 4GB of RAM, and four times the storage at 64GB. RAM and SoC are the notable differentiators between the models, since you can expand storage on both with a microSD card. Both models also have dual microSIM slots. But even at 1.8GHz and 2GB of RAM, you're going to be able to run any new Android app and game without problems.

The respectable performance doesn't come as a surprise, so we turn to the areas that really differentiate the day-to-day use of a smartphone: display quality, camera, and battery life. On these counts, the Asus ZenFone is above average, but doesn't claim any crowns. Let's start with the screen.

How Life Finds a Way in Earth's Extreme Environments

"Life will find a way." That mantra isn't just true in Jurassic Park; nature's resilience is particularly noticeable in some of Earth's most extreme environments. From super-high flyers to super-deep swimmers, there's no shortage of strange evolutions on our planet that allow animals to perform some truly bizarre and nearly impossible feats in order to survive. A new exhibit at New York City's American Museum of Natural History rounds up some of the world's most extreme adaptations. Here's a look at just a few examples of the bizarre behaviors of Life At The Limits.

Extreme Temperatures

Frilly Leech — Even though it's own habitat almost never freezes, the frilly leech can survive 24 hours submerged in liquid nitrogen (-320f) in the lab. They can be stored up to 9 months at -130F and one was once revived after 2.5 years in the deep cold.

Tardigrades — These tiny organisms, also known as water bears, can survive being completely dehydrated. They make proteins that revive their cells when water is introduced, coming back to life in as little as 4 minutes. They also can survive temperatures down to near-absolute-zero (-458F) and more than 302F.

Ice Worm — Just like it's name says, this worm lives its entire lifecycle inside the glaciers of Alaska. If they get too close to the air and they feel sunlight warming the surface they burrow down deep to get away from the heat.

Algorithm Turns Any Object into a Rubik's Cube

Columbia University's Timothy Sun and Changxi Zheng presented this research paper and video illustrating a computational method to turn any 3D model into a Rubik's Cube-style puzzle. Presented at this year's SIGGRAPH, the software analyzes any user-supplied 3D model and inserts the proper twisty joints into the design, which can then be 3D printed into an interlocking puzzle. (h/t Gizmodo)

In Brief: AMD Fury X Reviews and Benchmarks

Reviews for AMD's latest flagship GPU are out, and the benchmarks reveal a card capable of solid for 1080p and 1440p gaming, and really excelling at 4K resolution. We don't have a R9 Fury X card in the office to test, but I would direct you to Tom's Hardware, Tech Report, PC Gamer, and PC World for benchmark binging. The upshot: the $650 card is about equal to Nvidia's GTX 980 Ti, with some room for overclocking.

Norman 3
Testing: Blade 200QX, A Multi-Purpose Multi-Rotor

A good indicator of the success of any multi-rotor model is the number of different accessories and hop-ups that are offered for it. By that measure, the Blade 200QX is a big hit. Blade and several other companies offer an array of products for pilots who want to personalize their 200QX and/or change how it performs.

I've been testing a 200QX for about two months. It is definitely a widely versatile multi-rotor, even without modification. Today, I'll share my opinions of the 200QX in stock form. I will also illustrate three add-ons that allowed me to try new things with this quad.

Honey, I Shrunk the Skids

The first thing that I noticed about the 200QX is that it looks a lot like my Blade 350 QX3 – only smaller (200mm diameter vs 350mm). Both feature a plastic shell as the main structural component and they share very similar styling. Although both quads are intended for Spektrum brand radios, the 200QX is only available as a Bind-N-Fly model. I linked the little quad to my DX8 transmitter.

The 200QX presents a unique combination of size, weight, and power that makes it difficult to categorize. If a defining label is truly necessary, I think "Mini Sport Quad" would encompass the primary features of the 200QX. It is only slightly larger than several of my indoor quads, but its brushless motors and 2-cell LiPo battery make it much more powerful. Living room flights are probably taboo. Yet, I found an indoor basketball court to be a fun and comfortable flying spot.

The 200QX offers styling similar to Blade's larger quad-rotors. Brushless motors and a 2-cell LiPo battery provide ample power.

This quad has plenty of power and control authority for outdoor flights, but its small size will force you to keep it relatively close in. On the flip side, the bare 200QX weighs less than 7 ounces. Its light weight was a confidence builder for me. When flying over reasonably tall grass, I felt like I could push my comfort zone without much concern over breaking parts if I had a hiccup.