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Tested In-Depth: Mac OS X 10.10 Yosemite

Mac OS X Yosemite is out today! We've been running and testing the various betas leading up to the final release, and sit down to discuss what's new and noteworthy in the latest version of Apple's desktop and laptop operating system. There's more than just a few cosmetic changes!

Apple Announces New iPads, Retina iMac, and Mac Mini

Despite the product leaks via its own store yesterday, Apple managed to surprise us with the announcements at this morning's press briefing. We'll start off with the annual iPad updates, which fall into two categories. On the full-size iPad, Apple didn't announce any "pro" model, sticking with improvements to the iPad Air. It's now 6.1mm thick, uses an optically bonded LCD, supports 802.11AC MIMO Wi-Fi, and runs off of the expected A8X. Weight finally drops below one pound at 435 grams. TouchID also comes to the iPad Air 2, but no NFC for mobile payments (though Apple Pay will be supported). Apple made a big deal about the new 8MP f/2.4 camera in the iPad Air 2, which shoots better 1080p video and has a burst mode. It'll also come in gold. The iPad Air 2 is available for pre-order this Friday and will ship by the end of next week. Pricing is familiar--$500 for 16GB--but $100 more gets your 64GB, like with the iPhone 6. Last year's iPad Air stays in the lineup, getting a $100 price cut.

The iPad Mini 3 only got a brief mention at the presentation--it has now a TouchID home button. It's otherwise exactly the same as last year's popular Mini with Retina, down to the A7 processor. We were impressed that Apple put the same internal hardware in the iPad Air and Mini lines, but it looks like they're segmenting their lines again this year. That's a little disappointing. Last year's iPad Mini gets a price cut to $300 for the 16GB Wi-Fi model, while the Mini 3 starts at $400. $100 is a LOT to pay for TouchID, especially since there's no NFC chip in the Mini 3, either. If you're in the market for a new iPad (eg. still using the first iPad Mini or an iPad 3 or older), my recommendation would be to get the iPad Mini 2.

A Retina iMac also made its debut today, in a 27-inch iMac equipped with a 5120x2880 screen. It has the same formfactor as the existing iMacs, but the high-density LED backlit display now runs off of AMD's Radeon R9 M290X GPU (a mobile GPU). The base configuration has a 3.5GHz Haswell Core i5 (upgradeable to a i7 4GHz), 1TB Fusion drive, and 8GB of RAM. It starts at a whopping $2500. It's available today. Apple didn't upgrade the 21-inch iMac, though we're expecting refreshes in the spring with Intel's Broadwell CPU release. A 5K desktop iMac indicates that Apple could release a standalone Retina Cinema Display in the future as well. Update: this Anandtech hands-on explains why this display (which is likely the same panel as what's in Dell's 27-inch 5K monitor) would not work off of a single DisplayPort connection. MaximumPC got a closer look at the Dell 5K panel in September, which retails alone for $2500 and requires two DisplayPort 1.2 connections.

Finally, the Mac Mini got a long-awaited upgrade. It now runs on a Haswell CPU (1.4GHz dual-core i5 standard), 802.11AC, and two Thunderbolt ports. PCI-e storage is an upgrade option, as is a i7 CPU. It also goes on sale today, and the base price has dropped from $600 to $500.

We'll be testing the new iPad Air 2, though the iMac Retina likely won't be sufficient for the kind of video editing we do. iPads have always had great LCD displays, so I'm curious to see how that holds up with the new optical bonding on the Air. Let us know what from the presentation interests you, and how you feel about this year's new iPads and iMac.

NYCC: Triforce's Video Game Replica Props

We've met and worked with independent replica prop makers who specialize in video game props, but here's a company working directly with game developers to bring digital characters, armor, and weapons to reality. At New York Comic Con, we stopped by Triforce's booth to check out their newest scale statues and full-size replicas, as well as learn about their production process.

My 10 Favorite Items in Prop Store's Epic Auction

Tomorrow's a big day for prop collectors and replica prop makers. As we mentioned in our video of Adam's new Samurai armor from 47 Ronin, London and LA-based Prop Store is gearing up for one of the largest film prop auctions in recent memory, and easily one of the most important. The auction is mere hours away, and will be held live in London at the Westfield Mall's Vue Cinema. We were fortunate to see some of those props in person at Comic-Con as well, where Prop Store had iconic items like Marty's hoverboard on display (I touched it!). For those of us who can't make it to the auction or are curious about how much these props end up going for, we'll be able to follow along online at the auction website.

Since receiving it earlier this month, I've been spending lunch hours poring over the auction catalog and admiring the lovely photos and cool production info associated with each prop. Here are the props from the auction that I'm the most excited for, either because of their significance to film and effects history, their personal resonance, or because they're just so cool.

1/4 Scale Alien Queen Puppet from Aliens

"A 1⁄4-scale puppet of the Alien Queen from James Cameron’s action sci-fi sequel Aliens. This puppet was used for the model miniature shots during the scene in which Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) drops the beast into the Sulaco’s airlock, only to be dragged down with it.

Conceived by director James Cameron and brought to life by Stan Winston Studios, the puppet is made of multiple components built around a metal armature for strength and was designed to be dropped to accommodate the shot. The head, crown and body of the puppet are made in dense urethane. The Queen’s teeth are cast in translucent resin to match the detail of the full-size creation. The arms are made of foam latex with urethane used for the tail, while the legs are made from latex and polyfoam. Due to their age, the outer limbs have deteriorated. Wire runs down the length of the tail and down the arms in order for the limbs to hang freely for the fall. The Queen’s carapace is finished in black with blue highlights to match the lighting of shots within the Sulaco hangar."

Bits to Atoms: 3D Printing Quicksilver's Stereobelt

Remember a few months ago when I spent time obsessing over Quicksilver’s audio gear from X-men: Days of Future Past? I thought that exploration was enough to get it out of my system--until my friend Hadley told me that she would be cosplaying as Quicksilver for New York Comic Con. Without missing a beat, I proclaimed that I had to build her an accurate Stereobelt prop. And so my obsession began anew.

Prototype - designing multiple parts - more work for better results

To recap: the Stereobelt, a little-known predecessor to the Walkman, predating Sony's portable cassette player by seven years and cobbled together from existing tech. Only one picture and a patent document of it can be found in all of the interwebs, yet the savvy production designers on Days of Future Past based Quicksilver’s unit on the Stereobelt, therefore giving him probable audio gear for 1973.

Setting out to create my own Stereobelt, I ran into an immediate problem: a lack of good reference material. Other than the magazine cover of Quicksilver, which showed only one side of the belt, I was unable to find any good reference of the other side or back. At this point, the Blu-ray hadn’t been released and unlike every other Marvel movie, there was no “Making-of” book. So, I started work on what I had reference for, figuring that I may have to improvise the opposite side and revise it when I could get ahold of the movie. I didn’t have a lot of time to build the Stereobelt, so my original intention was to keep it simple and print it as one solid piece. The front and back caps would cause some print issues since they were both tapered and would have to use supports to print as one piece. The caps would also print better if the slopes were oriented upwards, so I decided to compromise and print the body and caps separately and assemble using simple square pins and glue.

Solid body with caps connected via pins.

Unlike the Hellboy Millenbaugh Motivator, for which I took meticulous measurements using Photoshop, I totally eyeballed the size and proportions of the Stereobelt on paper. Once it looked right, I started building in 3D and quickly realized another issue - if I built this as one piece, painting and finishing would be difficult since it had a lot of trim pieces. I also liked the idea of being able to print this out in two colors, assemble with no painting and still have it look good, so I decided to break it up into more pieces.

Shooting Scale Models using Forced Perspective

Joey Shanks of PBS Digital Studios' Shanks FX show shoots a short video using 1/24th and 1/15th scale models of the Back to the Future Delorean to recreate effects scenes from the film. Shanks gives some tips for using forced perspective to make his models appear as if they're driving on a real road, and explains why using a smaller model might be better than a larger one.

Google Announces Nexus 6 Phone, Nexus 9 Tablet

Nexus 6. Nexus 9. Nexus Player. All made their official debut today in Google's announcement of the next generation of Nexus devices. They all, of course, run Android L. Or as it's now officially named, Android 5.0 Lollipop. The Nexus 6 is made by Motorola, and looks like a larger version of the recently-released Moto X (my review next week!). It has a Quad HD 2560x1440 OLED display, which is likely the same screen used in Samsung's Galaxy Note 4. It'll run Qualcomm's latest Snapdragon 805 processor, clocked at 2.7GHz, which is a step up from the 801 processor found in the majority of 2014 flagship phones. But most importantly, it'll have a 3220 mAh battery, a significant boost from the 2300 mAh battery in the current Moto X. That may be its most important feature. The Nexus 6 will be available for preorder on Oct 29th, under contract for all major US carriers and also sold as an unlocked GSM phone for $650. Ouch. For users of [relatively] smaller phones, Google will continue to offer the Nexus 5, though no updates in internal hardware are expected.

On the tablet side, HTC is making Google's Nexus 9, which has a 8.9" 2048x1536 IPS LCD screen. That's a 4:3 ratio screen, which is a good thing for a tablet this size. It'll run Nvidia's Tegra K1 SoC, with 2GB of RAM, and a 6700mAh battery. Pricing is listed at $400 for 16GB and $480 for 32GB, with an LTE model selling later this year for $600. No microSD storage. Pre-orders begin on Friday and it'll ship on November 3rd. I think the pricing on this tablet makes the Nvidia tablet that much more appealing, especially with its expandability and media output options.

Finally, Google announced a streaming box that'll run Android TV--their latest effort in the set-top space. Nexus Player will be made by Asus and looks like your typical set-top puck with power, HDMI, and 802.11AC MIMO Wi-Fi connectivity for your standard slew of streaming services. It has 8GB of internal storage and a simple remote that supports voice search, and Google is selling a gamepad accessory to support Android games. The Nexus Player will go on sale on November 3rd

Watch Google's announcement video for the new line of Nexus devices below.

In Brief: HBO to Offer Stand-Alone Streaming Service in 2015

This is it! At a Time Warner investor meeting today, HBO's CEO Richard Plepler announced that the company will offer a stand-alone HBO streaming service (likely HBO Go) in 2015. Citing the growing number of US households that don't pay for cable or satellite television, but are broadband only--10 million and growing--Plepler said that it was time to remove all barriers to those who want HBO. The plan was only announced for the US market, with no word on pricing. What do you think they'll charge for a monthly HBO Go streaming subscription? What would you pay? My guess is $15 a month.

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Photo Gallery: Behind the Scenes at Immortal Masks

During our visit to Immortal Masks, we not only got a chance to learn about their entire sculpting and production process, but also check out their entire line of creature masks. Sculptor Andrew Freeman is always working on new mask designs, and their team of artists can create variations on a sculpt with unique paint applications. Lifelike Bebop and Rocksteady masks caught my eye, but my favorite has to be the Ogre mask. Which one do you think is the creepiest?