Latest Stories
Hands-On with Raw Data's New Multiplayer VR Demo

We visit the offices of Survios, a VR game company making a sci-fi multiplayer shooter for the HTC Vive and Oculus Touch. The new demo of Raw Data includes teleportation for moving around the map, hero classes, and special powers. We chat with Survios' Chief Creative Officer about some of their VR design ideas.

Hands-On with Manus VR Virtual Reality Gloves

Seeing your hands and arms in virtual reality is going to be a big deal, but there's no perfect solution yet for accurate and robust hand presence. That's what Manus VR is trying to achieve with its VR gloves, which we test at this year's E3. We learn how the gloves work and how it integrates with HTC Vive and Steam VR.

Browning It Up With Doug Stewart - Episode 42 - 6/17/16
We welcome SFX special costume designer Doug Stewart to this episode of Creaturegeek. We chat about adding brown to a costume and how to age a garment to look realistic. It's a fascinating discussion with another seasoned pro! If you are enjoying the show, head over to http://www.patreon.com/creaturegeek and support us with a few bucks. We are short of our monthly goal that brings you an extra show every month. So head on over to our Patreon, pledge a few bucks and help us get to three or more shows per month. Thanks for listening!
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The Graboid Puppets of Tremors 4

When writers S.S. Wilson and Brent Maddock came up with the original concept for Tremors they never dreamed they'd still be talking about Graboids fifteen years later. "Universal said that we'd never do another Tremors after the first one," recalled Wilson. "Then the video division pushed for Tremors 2. After that, we said, 'Okay, so now we're done.'"

But fans couldn't get enough of Perfection, Nevada, and the tale of a small group of citizens banding together to fight an uncommon foe. Tremors 3 followed, and a successful television franchise emerged as well. Each time, Stampede Entertainment – with Wilson, Maddock and producer Nancy Roberts at the creative helm – rose to the challenge of reinventing the Graboid, the underground creature that was the story's reason for being. When talk ofTremors 4 began to surface, Wilson met with Universal executive Patti Jackson to discuss the project. "I told Patti that we were really in a corner," Wilson recalled. "The fans were going to want a new creature, but we had no idea where to go. We couldn't just keep doing the same movie over and over." Off-handedly, Wilson added, "We'd have to do something wacky this time, like set it in the Old West." To his surprise, Jackson's response was, "That's fine."

Full-size mechanical puppet Graboids were built by KNB EFX Group for above-ground scenes, while shots of the creatures bursting from the earth were built and photographed in quarter scale by 4-Ward Productions.

Tremors 4: The Legend Begins, directed by Wilson from a script by Scott Buck, was released early in 2004 as part of a direct-to-DVD package with the original Tremors. Set in 1889, the story follows Hiram Gummer (Michael Gross), the great-grandfather of survivalist Burt Gummer and owner of a silver mine that has been faced with a series of mysterious deaths among the miners. Joining forces with other townsfolk – ancestors of characters who populate 1989 Perfection – Hiram sets out to determine what is killing the miners, and faces the underground enemy for the first time.

Oculus Touch Hands-On and Interview at E3 2016

We stop by the Oculus booth at E3 2016 to get hands-on time with Oculus Touch games, including Wilson's Heart and The Unspoken. Here's some of that gameplay, our impressions on those demos, and our hopes for hand presence in virtual reality. Plus, a chat with Palmer Luckey and Nate Mitchell about the Oculus Rift's launch, game exclusivity, and what's coming next.

Hands-On with Razer OSVR HDK 2 Virtual Reality Headset

We're at E3 this week checking out new virtual reality games and hardware. First up is Razer's new OSVR Hacker Development Kit 2. We learn about its display and lens system, how Razer is making this more of a consumer device, and get a hands-on demo. Here's why we're hopeful but cautious about this $400 headset.

How To Create Custom Fasteners for RC Projects

My time as an engineer in the aerospace business taught me that using the right fasteners can have a huge impact to the functionality and serviceability of an item. Sure, a common pan head machine screw will work to hold an access panel in place. But using a custom screw with an oversized Rosette head allows an astronaut in a spacesuit to quickly remove the panel without tools. I'm sure you can imagine what a tremendous advantage that is.

I often find that specialized hardware can provide similar benefits with my RC projects. The main difference boils down to a question of availability. If the specialty fastener that I want is even manufactured, it is usually prohibitively expensive or is only sold in large quantities. Other times, I need a special fastener "right now". Ordering online or even driving to the hardware store just won't cut it. More often than not, I end up making my own specialty fasteners by modifying common nuts and bolts that I already have in my workshop.

Making a thumb screw out of a Phillips head screw requires purposeful cutting of a plastic tab.

In this article, I will illustrate my techniques for creating three different types of custom fasteners.

Thumb Screws

Whether I'm going on a week-long vacation or just an afternoon trip to the flying field, I tend to be a minimalist when it comes to packing. I take only the bare essentials and try not to weigh myself down with accoutrements to deal with "what if" scenarios. This probably means that I'll be among the first to succumb to a zombie apocalypse. Until that brain-eating day, I'll live happily unencumbered.

Translating my streamlined packing approach to RC means that I aim to carry very few tools with me. If a specialty fastener lets me do a job without tools, then I'm game. That's why I often find myself turning normal screws into thumb screws. If you're not familiar with thumb screws, they are fasteners that are designed to be turned by hand rather than with tools. Thumbs screws are super-convenient as long as you don't have high torque requirements…which I almost never do for RC applications.

Transforming a slotted screw into a thumb screw is often as easy as gluing a scrap piece of plastic into the slot.

Converting a common slotted machine screw into a thumb screw is very easy. You just make an appropriately-sized tab out of scrap material and glue it into the slot of the screw. The tab becomes your grip for turning the screw. I have a sheet of 1/32"-thick Kydex plastic that I typically use to make tabs. I have also used craft sticks, thin plywood and scrap aluminum for the same job. You're bound to have something that will work. GOOP adhesive is great for gluing the tab to the slot.