PREMIUM – Science in Progress: 3D-Printing Organs

Indre and Kishore dive into a discussion about artificial organs and visit a UCSF lab where researchers are engineering an implantable artificial kidney, prototyping part of it with technologies we’d find in our own workshops!

Comments (8)

8 thoughts on “PREMIUM – Science in Progress: 3D-Printing Organs

  1. The result is what you see in the jar – an opaque white heart. It’s really delicate and the experiment ended way after hours, so we didn’t show a close up on final.

  2. wow, that kind of thing is something i would’ve thought of as being in the ghost in the shell class of scifi. a relative spent the last years of his life having to go to dialysis, and even if you disregard the factor of discomfort, the impact on mobility was enormous as well, because you have to plan your life around these stops that you can only make at certain institutions. even something trivial like a trip to see part of the family would require pre-arranging the necessary stops at local hospitals. that this would alleviate being bound to such a strict plan of having to be at a certain kind of place at certain intervals of time, is huge.

    and having it run with the fluid pressure that’s already there seems to solve an additional host of problems, not only power wise, but also in terms of how many moving parts such an artificlal kidney would have.

  3. This is incredible! This could be life-changing for millions of people.

    And as you may or may not know, dialysis costs US tax payers billions every year, with for-profit centers gouging the government and providing a poor standard of care. John Oliver did a solid overview on it a few weeks ago: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yw_nqzVfxFQ

  4. My Dad suffered during his last years of life and dialysis was one of treatments that became less effective during his deterioration healthwise. R&D is one of the most important functions of an scientific oriented society. (I will refrain from political commentary).

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