Podcast - This Is Only a Test

Episode 59 – Mission to Mars – 3/31/2011

This week the Tested gang talks about iPhone 5 rumors, Amazon’s CloudMusic service, the Nintendo 3DS, Acer’s insane dual-screen notebook, and Garrison Keillor. All that plus fake outtakes and Will singing showtunes on this week’s episode of This is Only a Test.

Comments (37)

37 thoughts on “Episode 59 – Mission to Mars – 3/31/2011

  1. FakePlasticTree just replied to your comment:

    ” Toronto Canada, at least for the next couple months.”

    I live in Toronto for approximately half the year.  The other half I spend living in Waterloo, which is also in Ontario. “

    Only been to Waterloo once. Seems like a good party town though. 

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  2. I like Amazon Cloud for music purposes, but I wish that I could upload whole directories. Is there any way to do that?

  3. I’m so jealous of you guys and your sunny days already. Here in the Portland, Or area we are on our 24th day in a row with rain. T_T 

  4. Gary, come up to Seattle Museum of Flight. We have an AirForce One, SR-17,the FIRST 747, an Apollo capsule, a Lunar Rover, and a Concorde. Plus, it’s on an active airfield where Boeing tests 787, 747-8, and their military airliner conversions.

  5. Takashi Miike. Pronounced Me (like nintendo miis) kay (like the end of okay).  Miike.  Man, my ears bled from Takashi Mike.

  6. I’ve actually been to that Henry Ford Museum. Very cool. The Chrysler Museum is also pretty great. 
     
    Down here in Fort Myers, Florida, our local attraction is the Edison, Ford, and Firestone Estate. It’s basically where they hung out during the winter months. Obviously, most of Edison’s “inventions” were “discovered” at his main labs in Menlo, but they had some shared R&D labs here too.

  7. Am I the only one who’s never had Ben & Jerry’s ice cream before? I am a deprived individual =/

  8. Sure, that Jimmy Fallon flavor sounds weird.  But think back to Chubby Hubby. When that came out ages ago, I thought the idea of pretzels stuffed with peanut butter didn’t belong in ice cream.  But that one has been popular for over a decade.  I don’t think Midnight Snack is really any different.  

  9. Your sense of ancient history is off by about 500 years. 2500 years ago would be during the early Roman republic, about 470 years before the empire. In the Western world, it was mainly a period of Greek dominance of the Mediterranean. The most significant event in that time frame would be the Battle of Marathon, in which an Athenian naval force defeated an invading Persian force led by Darius, the father of Xerxes (the guy in 300). The period is basically just before the start of the Athenian golden age.


  10.    You make a very poor case. Iron, copper and other minerals are merely ancillary to sustained life. Oxygen, water, food, these are all things you can’t go along(live) without.   Even if these planets have the previously mentioned minerals, mining them would even be worth the cost of bring them back to earth. The cost per kg of payload in a rocket averages $5000/kg. The price of copper per kg is  $9.33/ kg.  The price of steel (iron and carbon, I can’t a raw iron/kg price, so I’ll give you the benefit of somehow finding refined steel on a planet) is $.25/kg.   Let’s say you’re really efficient you bring back 1000kg of cooper and 1000kg of refined steel, you would have made..$9580!!! But it costs 10 million dollars to exercise such a stupid venture, thus making mining anything that weighs more than it is worth to transport, financial impossible, or at least really stupid.   Space colonies aren’t going to happen anytime soon people. Our best bet is trying save the planet we have. There isn’t one like anywhere close.  

    Preserving our resources is important, but so is being ready for the inevitable point of when we run out of stuff too. Sure it’s only $10.00 a KG now, but the more we use of it the less we have, and the more it will keep going up and up and up until it reaches the point where it’s not worth the effort. Then what happens? We are stuck on a strip mined planet with no way to go other places to find new resources. You can try to use it as efficiently as possible, but no matter what we come up with we are going to reach a point when we are out of resources that we need. If we reach that point and don’t have access to the capabilities needed to go to other planets to find the resources our planet runs out of, then we are stuck on a life less planet.
     
    We are already blowing through a metric crap ton of the worlds resources as it is with our current population. A population that is growing exponentially, and short of wide spread disease, war, famine or global government intervention to pass laws that rewards not reproducing, to out right forced sterilization, it’s not going to slow down any time soon. More people means less space to grow food, more people eating the limited food we already have that is getting harder and harder to make more of, because of the shrinking farm lands we have, and a higher demand for more housing units, which all require magnitudes of metals and fuel to run the machines to put it all together, means it’s going to come a time when we wake up to realize we are suddenly nearly out of key resources.  
     
    So yes, finding ways to preserve what we have now are of vital importance for the short term, but long term we need to find a way to spread out into the galaxy, and to do it cheaply. To think the two are mutually exclusive is idiotic. When we get to these places, they are no doubt going to be in short supply of some other kind of resource we need to survive, while being abundant in others. That’s when the years of refining what we have will allow us to stay there and mine what resources that planet does have to return it back to the main land to be distributed to where it is needed.

  11.  I did minimal wiki checks, actually, the only thing I actually looked up
    was what happened exactly 2,500 years ago in 490 BC (remember, no year
    0).
     
    I went to college at a school which required 3 semesters of
    Ancient Greek and a similar amount of reading from the period. While I’m
    hardly an expert on the subject, it is one of my favorite historical
    periods, as it’s one of the more important to development the modern
    world. I like you guys a lot, but it bothered me a bit that Will was off
    by 500 years on something that matters so much to me.
     
    I also really enjoy Herodotus, who’s was principal historical record for
    the events on which 300 was based as well as covering the Battle of
    Marathon, which I mentioned in my post. There’s a very well annotated
    translation that was published a few years ago, 
    http://www.amazon.com/Landmark-Herodotus-Histories-Robert-Strassler/dp/1400031141/,
    that I’d recommend if you’re interested in the period. One of the
    problems with reading Herodotus is that it can be a bit hard to figure
    out the geography, and that translation is a great help on that front
    due to some excellent maps.

  12. This week’s podcast is fantastic! If you guys aren’t careful your going to overtake the bombcast!

  13. I understand how that could happen. Again, your relative order is roughly correct. I actually made a mistake in my first post too; I confused the battle of Marathon with the Battle of Salamis. Salamis was the decisive naval battle against Xerxes, Marathon the land battle against Darius.

  14. I’m guessing you haven’t been to the Air & Space museum in little while because I didn’t hear any mention of the Udvar-Hazy Center. It’s out by Dulles Airport and has some of the best, and biggest, of the Smithsonian’s aviation collection. The building is big enough that is makes some of the more prominent pieces seem small, including the Enola Gay, an SR-71 Blackbird, and the Space Shuttle Enterprise. Yes, you can get up close to a Space Shuttle. It’s very cool. I highly recommend taking a trip out there.
     
    Also, chocolate. You guys live in what I believe is the best chocolate city in the United States. I spent a few years in San Francisco and chocolate is one of the things I miss the most. There are some really excellent chocolatiers in the area like Socola, Michael Ricciuti (close to WM in the Ferry Building), and a number of others. You also have two of something that’s missing in even many large cities in this country, a good chocolate store. There’s Fog City News on Market St and Chocolate Covered in Noe Valley. I live in a much bigger city now and we don’t have any, and chocolate doesn’t ship well in July. I end up stocking up when I visit SF or DC.

    Go to either place and ask for recommendations. The owners of both are friendly and helpful and should be able to point you towards something good. You seem like a guy who likes to seek out quality when it comes to food, and as someone who really enjoys good coffee, chocolate should be right up your alley. There are a number of chocolate makers, some from right here in America, who make really incredible stuff that most people don’t know about because you can’t even buy it at a lot of specialty food stores. It’s hard to find outside of these chocolate shops. My two favorite American makers are Askinosie and Amano. The former was started by a guy who was sick of being a lawyer and started roasting beans and making chocolate in his office kitchen. That sounds like a Tested segment in the making to me.

  15. There is a version of the last two matrix movies called the matrix dezionized

    http://fanedit.org/448/

    It’s about 2.5 hours if I remember and a much better “sequel” for it

    It basically combines the second two movies and rips out the Zion stuff and keeps the action heavy.

  16. I just listened to ‘s vibrato/falsetto “What the fuuuuuuuck?” about 10 times in the car before walking in to work. Still stifling my lols.

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