Podcast - Adam Savage Project

Master of None – Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project – 12/1/15

This week, Adam and the gang discuss one of Adam’s favorite props built for Mythbusters, revisit thoughts on Spectre in a semi-spoilercast, and gush over the first few episodes of Master of None. We also have time to answer a question from a listener!

Comments (26)

26 thoughts on “Master of None – Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project – 12/1/15

  1. just sounds like it’s just an EQ thing.

    YouTube video has a really nasty, loud, jarring audio noise at the start of the clip. Scared the pants off me.

  2. Norm said Master of None isn’t Aziz’s “Louie”, but had only watched a couple of episodes. I felt that way after 2 or 3, but by the last 3 or 4 in the series, I’d really changed my mind. I just gets better and better toward the end. (the writing does, not the acting).

  3. I want to hate you guys when you mention esoteric things like Challenge Coins and not elaborate on what the hell they are for the large numbers of people like myself who are clueless. But I can’t because it makes me go to google and learn on my own, which is something I love to do.

    I can’t count how many times I’ve paused this podcast over the last year or so and spent a half hour or more going down the Google/Wikipedia rabbit hole.

  4. Neat to know about the challenge coins, I have two for the two reenactment regiments I’m a part of. I’ll see if i can get my hands on a spare to get down to you guy in the mail.

  5. sorry about the static at the beginning of the episode! it’s being clipped out by youtube right now, so should be fixed in just a few minutes.

    we recorded this ep a few weeks back. since then, i finished Master of None and really loved the rest of the series!

  6. Master of None really hits close to home for me, especially the parents episode. Aziz had some verbatim dialogue that I’ve had with my dad. Just nailed the tension as a “recent immigrant” family (I was born in NY, but my parents in India) that was so incredibly authentic, both painful and joyous.

    With my father getting older, his homage to his dad really stuck with me after the series. Image below for those who may have missed it.

  7. Agreed, I genuinely love it when it takes me an hour and a half to get through a 30 minute podcast because of wiki-expeditions. :p

  8. Man, I really, really like Master of None.

    It is a great show. The main thing I like about it is that it is genuinely sweet and good-natured, and it manages to do that in a way that still makes critical points on our society, about how we treat each other.

    I think that it really stands out from very nearly everything that is popular right now, because of that.

  9. I also want to see the challenge coin collection. I haven’t watched Master of None yet, but if all three of you recommend something, it’s always been worth the time to check it out.

  10. I am in 100% agreement with Adam. The lathe has to be, hands down, the tool that I enjoy using the most. It was the very first machine tool that I ever trained on, nearly 35 years ago – a WW2 vintage South Bend lathe that still used the flat leather drive belts. In my garage shop, I have a Grizzly 12″ x 36″ gap bed metal lathe; it is very similar to the unit in Adam’s shop – alas I don’t have the DRO setup (although it is in my plans eventually). I also enjoy woodturning on a small Jet mini-lathe – it is a completely different experience than using the metal lathe. Whereas the metalwork is all about precision, setup and fixturing, the woodturning is far more spontaneous and open to whimsy – especially when you just have a short amount of time in the shop and instant gratification is the order of the day! 🙂

  11. I was really hoping that this podcast would be on what it’s like to be a jack-of-all-trades/master-of-none kind of person when it comes to things like science, tech, making etc.

    As a master of none person myself, I would love to get Adam’s take on it!

  12. I am in 100% agreement with Adam. The lathe has to be, hands down, the tool that I enjoy using the most. It was the very first machine tool that I ever trained on, nearly 35 years ago – a WW2 vintage South Bend lathe that still used the flat leather drive belts. In my garage shop, I have a Grizzly 12″ x 36″ gap bed metal lathe; it is very similar to the unit in Adam’s shop – alas I don’t have the DRO setup (although it is in my plans eventually). I also enjoy woodturning on a small Jet mini-lathe – it is a completely different experience than using the metal lathe. Whereas the metalwork is all about precision, setup and fixturing, the woodturning is far more spontaneous and open to whimsy – especially when you just have a short amount of time in the shop and instant gratification is the order of the day! 🙂

    I still use one of those South Bend lathes, learned on it 30mumble years ago. Really handy to wrap springs to cut chain mail rings from. Drill a hole thru a metal rod, mount in the jaws, and SLOWLY wind the wire around.

  13. Hi Still Untitled crew, it would be so awesome if you could get Ben Krasnow on the show for a chat (or even on the Talking Room). He builds and tests lots of cool stuff and documents them on his Youtube channel (channel name is “Applied Science”). His home-made scanning electron microscope is just really cool.

  14. i only have an old-fashioned, small lathe, for small woodturning projects. but i have to admit that turning wood is a very pleasurable activity. there’s something soothing and zen-ish to it, and a very distinct gratification to getting a complex tool movement just right, so you guide a rubbing bevel tip over the shape you want to turn in one smooth go.

    for me, it doesn’t quite hold up to the fascination of the early work on a wood bow, though. there’s something very special about starting with a roughly shaped piece of wood that feels like a decorative 2×4 in your hand and making it into something that bends in a lively, springy manner. i guess it doesn’t really qualify as a tool i really like using, though. i am very fond of using well-sharpened cutting hand tools in general, though. no matter whether it’s chisels, scrapers, woodturning tools, or draw knives.

  15. Regarding the “high school” comment about the Spectre Bond girl – the actress is 30. She’s young looking, and a good bit younger than Craig (who’s like 47), but not exactly a high schooler.

  16. I have to agree with Adam on the lathe. I bought my first lathe at 18, and have yet to find a more pleasurable experience in the shop. In a meditative sense, however, I adore TIG welding. Some time ago, I worked at a shop that had me TIG welding 6-8 hours a day several times a week. As a result, I got to be quite proficient, but also came to find it to be incredibly peaceful and satisfying in nearly an artistic sense.

  17. for me, it doesn’t quite hold up to the fascination of the early work on a wood bow, though. there’s something very special about starting with a roughly shaped piece of wood that feels like a decorative 2×4 in your hand and making it into something that bends in a lively, springy manner. i guess it doesn’t really qualify as a tool i really like using, though. i am very fond of using well-sharpened cutting hand tools in general, though. no matter whether it’s chisels, scrapers, woodturning tools, or draw knives.

    Here’s an article from the SolidSmack website that brought you immediately to mind :

    http://www.solidsmack.com/design/nordic-bow-and-arrow/

  18. neat find. many thanks! 🙂 i’m always happy to see articles attempting to put the idea of bowmaking into peoples’ minds.

    *puts on nerd glasses* heating and tempering isn’t a necessary step in bowmaking, though, and between step 3 and step 4 comes the crucial part of the whole process: as soon as you get a properly distributed bend in both limbs, you’d have to proceed in small steps, increasing how far/with how much force you draw the bow, continually taking off wood, until it’s the amount of draw-weight you want it to have at your draw length.

    i really like the first embedded video, there. nice replica. 🙂

  19. it’s a good rabbit hole to be in. very comfy. 🙂

    re that material reduction model to design a bow riser: at first, i was surprised i hadn’t seen anything like that before – but then it dawned on me: the fibreglass guys usually want a good bit of weight in their riser for stabilisation. after all, mass is only detrimental the closer it is to the tips of the limbs, where it travels the longest distance and sucks up valuable energy. close to the handle, it’s moving little enough that limbs can be bulky without adverse effects, and at the handle, it has no effect at all – except tiring your shoulder, that is.

    it isn’t really ugly, is it? i don’t know if i’d call it beautiful, but it has a certain charm to it.

    for the completely opposite approach, as far as cost and specialised development process goes: nick tomihama (https://www.youtube.com/user/BackyardBowyer) shapes bows out of pvc pipes with heat.

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