Meet the Maker: Sam Tumolo, New York Hall of Science

By Kristen Lomasney

For Sam Tumolo, a coordinator in the Maker Space at the New York Hall of Science, Project Egress was a natural extension of her interests.

For Sam Tumolo, a coordinator in the Maker Space at the New York Hall of Science, Project Egress was a natural extension of her interest in large-scale collaborative projects that showcase different unique forms of making.

Read about Sam, the New York Hall of Science, and the bottom to right side bell crank assembly made for Project Egress!

About: The New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) was founded at the 1964–65 World's Fair and has evolved into New York's center for interactive science, serving a half million students, teachers, and families each year.

NYSCI serves schools, families and underserved communities in the New York City area, offering informal, hands-on learning through various products and services that use the "design-make-play" method of bringing delight and play to educating science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Bio: Sam Tumolo is a maker interested in exploring the intersections of art, science, and design. Sam is a Coordinator in the Maker Space at the New York Hall of Science, developing educational programs in different forms of making. Sam previously worked in the Tech Studio at the Franklin Institute, where she taught 3D design and developed a youth program focused on designing and fabricating telescopes.

PINK #36: BOTTOM TO RIGHT SIDE BELL CRANK ASSEMBLY

Artist Statement: "One of my favorite parts about working in the NYSCI Maker Space is designing collaborative, science-themed installations that engage the community by introducing participants to new tools, materials and processes. These projects allow visitors to feel a unique individualized connection to the museum space, and can help create new connections between our space and our community.

For me, being a part of Project Egress felt like a natural extension of my interest in large-scale collaborative projects that showcase different unique forms of making.

Fabricating the side bell crank was more challenging than expected! Initially we printed the two parts in PLA on a Lulzbot Mini without support material. After this attempt failed, we realized support material was necessary. Since the smaller piece needs to fit through a hole in the larger one, it was important that the tolerances were tight. However once the supports were programmed and the parts re-printed, we saw that the smaller piece was now too wide to fit inside the larger. We then re-printed the piece in magnetic iron PLA and sanded it to fit. Since the sanding caused stress on the plastic and turned it white, we used a blowtorch to correct the discoloration."

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