Meet the Maker: Nemo Gould

By Kristen Lomasney

When we approached him for Project Egress, Nemo Gould didn't disappoint, choosing to create his part in a material that tells its own story.

The kinetic sculptures of Nemo Gould have fascinated us for a long time, which is why we've covered them -- as well as his maker space -- on Tested. And when we approached him for Project Egress, Nemo didn't disappoint, choosing to create his part in a material that tells its own story.

Read on to learn more about Nemo and the decisions behind the making of his hatch part.

Bio: Oakland, California-based found-object fine artist Nemo Gould has produced a prolific body of work that attempts to reconcile the innocent wonder of youth with the dull complexity of the adult experience. A look at his portfolio will deeply challenge any preconceived notion of what art made from salvaged materials can look like. His kinetic works bear clean, polished lines, exhibit fluid motion, and evoke a genuine, childlike sense of wonder and surprise.

Gould earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at the Kansas City Art Institute in 1998, and his Master of Fine Arts degree at U.C. Berkeley in 2000. His work has been featured frequently in national media and is shown in galleries and museums throughout the U.S. and abroad.

Artist Statement: "Even 50 years later, the moon landing remains one of the greatest engineering triumphs of humankind. How many individual peoples efforts went into the project unnoticed? As an artist, with limited technical skill, I enjoyed the challenge of reproducing my part of the hatch as accurately as I could, using techniques and equipment similar to those used at the time of the original Apollo program.

I decided to use acrylic because it makes an otherwise mundane piece of hardware seem somehow precious, and I like the idea of an invisible part, made by the invisible hand of the technicians who worked on the original spacecraft."

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