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How To Sync Your Browser Bookmarks and Tabs to the Cloud

By Matthew Braga

Xmarks is a web-based browser syncing tool. It'll take saved bookmarks of your choosing, send them off to the cloud, and then sync them back to a browser on any computer you use. Take note, internet pack-rats; it's as awesome as it sounds.

Dropbox, a great solution for keeping your files synced across multiple computers; whether at work, at home or a friend's seaside villa, those files are available wherever you wish. This can be a handy method with which to backup your bookmarks, and keep them current across multiple PCs. However, there are a couple of caveats, and it's not the most flexible of solutions for this sort of thing. Instead, when you want to bring your web browsing experience to the cloud, you'll want to use Xmarks.

Xmarks is a web-based browser syncing tool. It'll take saved bookmarks of your choosing, send them off to the cloud, and then sync them back to a browser on any computer you use. The advantage here is not just cross-platform, but cross-browser compatibility. Your Firefox bookmarks in Ubuntu can be synced with your Chrome install in OS X, modified in Internet Explorer, and then later accessed on your iPhone. It's slick, easy, and for internet pack-rats, indispensable.
 
And with its newest feature, Xmarks is more useful than ever. 
 
Currently, the Xmarks plugin can be installed with Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Internet Explorer. Additionally, there's both a web and mobile-based interface for remote access as well. However, Xmarks' newest feature is sure to become one of the handiest yet. Tab Sync does exactly what the name implies. Like bookmarks, open tabs are regularly beamed back to your Xmarks account and sorted by machine. Those sites can then be accessed from a computer at school, work, or even back at home, and updated accordingly. And as with bookmarks, Tab Sync is a cross-browser feature; Chrome, Internet Explorer and Firefox can all share tabs with each other, while Safari support is undoubtedly in the works.

Mobile users aren't forgotten either, as a web-based interface makes both bookmarks and tabs available nearly anywhere there's an online connection. In cases like this, there's nothing more meta than bookmarking a bookmark sync service. 

For someone who never works with the same machine twice, Xmarks is a godsend. It turns web browsing into an experience that's not tied to a machine —- just the sort of thing the cloud was made for. But most importantly, it's a great backup tool, and one that ensures your bookmarks and tabs stay just as you left them, anywhere you want. After all, that folder of Nickleback video links is not something you want to lose.
 
Images via Xmarks, Flickr user svenwerk.