Latest StoriesSpace
    Photo Gallery: Tom Sachs' Space Program Europa

    After taking part in Tom Sachs' Space Program: Europa mission (in charge of Special Effects, natch), Adam takes us through the exhibit currently on display at San Francisco's YBCA. Here are photos of some of the pieces in the exhibit, featuring Tom's signature build style and obsession with NASA's missions and operating procedures.

    Tested Mailbag: Simone's Space Camp Jumpsuit!

    Simone returns to the Tested office after a few weeks of travel to find this awesome mailbag package from a fan. Its contents combine some of Simone's favorite things. Plus, her first tasting of Astronaut ice cream! Thanks so much to Carley Hansen-Prince for sending this mailbag!

    Adam Savage's One Day Builds: NASA Spacesuit Parts!

    Adam dons his replica Apollo-era spacesuit, made by replica spacesuit builder Ryan Nagata. As part of their ongoing collaboration, today's One Day Build entails milling parts for the spacesuit, including a radiation dosimeter and aluminum knobs. But all doesn't go right as Adam has to overcome a maker's slump.

    An Interview with Astronaut Clayton Anderson

    One of the biggest perks of my time working at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) in Houston was the opportunity to mingle with a large portion of the astronaut corps. There was always a steady stream of folks in blue jumpsuits who came to the NBL to train for spacewalks. Other space flyers were poolside in supporting roles. It didn't take much time working with the astronauts to figure out that they do not fit a rigid mold. Sure, all of them that I met were extremely smart people and habitual overachievers. Beyond that, they were subject to the same variables that you would find in any other group of humans.

    Clayton Anderson was an astronaut for 15 years. He spent 167 days in space and logged nearly 40 hours of spacewalking time.

    They Are Only People

    Some astronauts were laser-focused on the tasks ahead, while others seemed to take a more relaxed approach. Many were silly jokesters, but a few were more solemn. The vast majority of astronauts were gracious and easy to work with.

    I think I speak for most of my NBL colleagues when I say that Clayton Anderson was one of our favorite astronauts to have around. He was always quick to shatter any illusions of rank with a self-effacing joke. The next minute, you might find yourself the target of a publicly-delivered, yet good-natured verbal jab from Clay that made you feel like part of his inner circle. Even in such a lighthearted atmosphere, the work never suffered. That was critical, since underwater training at the NBL is full of deadly hazards. Working with Clay convinced me that you don't have to be stuffy to be a perfectionist.

    I was completely flummoxed when a few of my colleagues from the Mission Control Center (MCC) told me that Clay's reputation among flight controllers wasn't nearly as rosy as his NBL image. Some of NASA's "console jocks" felt that he was a troublemaker and difficult to work with. I later learned that there were widely differing opinions of Clay even among his comrades in the astronaut corps. I was never able to reconcile the negative things I heard about Clay with my positive personal experiences working with him. Sometimes I wasn't even sure that we were talking about the same person!

    Ryan Nagata's NASA Spacesuit Replicas

    Prop maker Ryan Nagata is obsessed with NASA spacesuits, and has made the best replicas Adam has seen. While at his workshop, Adam and Ryan geek out over the process of fabricating fake spacesuits, including fabric selection, sewing, building hardware, and weathering. Plus, Adam gets a surprise!

    Maker Spaces: Adam Savage Tours Ryan Nagata's Workshop!

    In this new series, Adam Savage visits makers to learn about their work spaces and how they build. We first stop by the new shop of spacesuit replica builder Ryan Nagata. Ryan moved into this space after working out of a garage, and chats with Adam about how he organizes and utilizes his tools for costume and prop fabrication.

    Rocket Footage from 75 Miles High

    This video of a rocket launch from the rocket's perspective was released by Colorado-based UP Aerospace last November, and is highlighted by GoPro in their awards showcase: "On November 6, 2015 UP Aerospace successfully executed a mission for NASA to deploy the Maraia Earth Return Capsule. The mission reached an altitude of 75 miles above Spaceport America and landed 30 miles down range on White Sands Missile Range. The missions was UP Aerospace's 10th SpaceLoft rocket launch and the first deployment mission." Find more videos of UP Aerospace launches here.

    Hands-On with NASA's HoloLens Mars Demo

    NASA has been working with Microsoft's HoloLens technology to allow its Mars Curiosity rover engineers to visualize Mars and plan missions for the robot. We try a version of this OnSight application and chat with NASA's Dave Lavery about the potential of this kind of mobile virtual reality.

    The Joy and Pain of Wearing NASA's Spacesuits

    During my time working as a contractor for NASA, I was presented with several opportunities to wear an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), the suit that spacewalking astronauts have used since the beginning of the space shuttle program. While the majority of my experience as a suit-wearing "test subject" was exciting and enjoyable, it wasn't all fun and games. The EMU has a way of showcasing the humility of its occupants and I was no exception.

    When people ask me about my experience in the EMU, I usually tell them, "The only thing better than getting into an EMU is getting back out." It may sound cavalier, but it's the most efficient wording that reflects the love-hate relationship that I slowly developed with the suit. I never turned down a chance to wear the EMU in any capacity. I was often sleepless with excitement the night before. At the same time, I was never sad for those events to come to an end. All I wanted was to slither my body out of its puffy man-made cocoon and pop a few ibuprofen to ward off the aches and pains that often followed.

    The Extravehicular Mobility Unit has been worn by astronauts and lucky test subjects for decades. (NASA photo)

    The fun parts of being in the suit are pretty obvious. Who wouldn't jump at the chance to play junior astronaut? Those good parts always outweighed the bad. It took a while for many of the downsides to emerge, but some unexpected challenges just couldn't wait. This story reflects the beginning of my gradual awakening to the indignities, discomforts, and dangers that are inextricably linked to the fun and exhilaration of wearing an EMU.

    If the Suit Fits…

    Rather than being a custom-tailored suit for each astronaut and test subject, the EMU is a modular system consisting of several components (legs, arms, etc.)…each available in a few different sizes. It is your specific combination of parts that makes the suit fitted to you. Nailing down the sizing for someone is a process that requires a minimum of three separate events. Some astronauts come back again and again during their career to address trouble spots or accommodate changes in their body.

    During the first sizing step, I had to stand partially naked while technicians compiled a long list of my body measurements. This data allowed engineers to take a preliminary stab at what components would fit me.

    The EMU is a modular system with many of the components available in different sizes. The gloves have the widest variety of sizing options. (Bill Brassard photo)

    A week or two after getting measured, I was allowed to try on a few different sets of gloves that had been picked out for me. Of all the different EMU components, the gloves have the largest variety of sizes to choose from. For these types of events, the gloves are attached to arm components within a vacuum box. The pressure difference afforded by the box provides the same feel as gloves attached to a pressurized suit, but with a much smaller overhead.

    Another week or so after choosing my favorite gloves, it was time to go all the way and put on the full EMU. I don't recall having any apprehension about this…just excitement. I had watched people get into and out of EMUs every day as part of my normal job duties. It was always a non-event for them, so why should I be any different?

    "Let's Go to Mars" Panel at Silicon Valley Comic Con

    At Silicon Valley Comic Con, Adam hosts a panel discussing what it would take for a manned mission to Mars. Joining him are author Andy Weir and planetary scientist Chris McKay, who is actively involved in planning for NASA's future Mars missions.

    Hamilton and The Three Body Problem SPOILERCAST! - Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project - 3/01/16
    The latest book we're gushing over is Liu Cixin's The Three Body Problem, a science-fiction story with ideas that blew our minds. Adam, Norm, and Will review the book and discuss its concepts in a Spoilercast! Adam also talks about his current obsession with Hamilton: The Musical, and we hear Norm's best segue yet.
    00:00:00 / 32:25
    Adam Savage's 'The Martian' Spacesuit Project

    It's no secret that we've been enamored with the spacesuit from The Martian. From the moment we saw the costume in the film's first teaser trailer, we were impressed by designer Janty Yates' imagining of near-future NASA gear, and special effects studio FBFX's ability to bring those designs to reality. It's no surprise then that Adam has been looking forward to building a replica of the costume. But it's not going to be easy--it's a project much bigger in scope than a One Day Build. It's a project that's going to take many months, and we want to bring you along for the build.

    Over the course of this year, Adam and Frank Ippolito will be working on building their own The Martian spacesuit replicas, using the processes and materials of the original fabricators. We've been given unprecedented access to one of the costumes to document and create reference, but that's only the beginning. There will be more research, experimenting with materials, and a whole lot of prototyping, building, polishing, and finishing work. Every month, we're going to show you the progress of Adam's suit replica, with in-depth videos for the Tested Premium member community. In this new video series, you'll get to see every new discovery, every part of the fabrication process, and yes, all the mistakes as well.

    We're excited to show and share for the first time Adam's entire replica building process for a prop of this complexity. It's not going to be easy. Failure may be an option, but one thing's for certain: this is going to be fun! Join the Tested Premium Member Community today to follow along with this build and get exclusive updates!

    Replicating 'The Martian' Spacesuit, Part 1: Building Reference

    Adam Savage has been granted unprecedented access to one of his favorite movie costumes: the spacesuit from The Martian. Over the course of this year, Adam aims to replicate the spacesuit, keeping as close to the original as possible. The first step is to study and document the prop, creating reference through photos, sketches, patterning, and even photogrammetry! (Bring home The Martian on Blu-ray™, DVD & Digital HD today.)

    Watch This Animated Short: "We Can't Live Without Cosmos"

    This 2014 animated short from Russian director Konstantin Bronzit is nominated for an Academy Award, and tells the poignant story of two best friends who have dreamed since childhood of becoming cosmonauts. It's a story told without a single word uttered, but says volumes about friendship, humanity, and the loneliness endured by the brave men and women who put their lives at stake in pursuit of the final frontier.

    What it Takes to Keep a B-29 Superfortress Flying

    Last month, we looked at the dedication and financial resources that are required to keep a WWII-era P-51 Mustang in flyable condition. It is definitely not for the meek or frugal. As civilian-owned warbirds go, the P-51 probably represents the middle of the road in terms of overhead. Many aspiring warbird owners seek former trainer and liaison aircraft because they are generally much easier and less costly to maintain and operate than fighters. At the opposite end of the scale are large, multi-engine transports and bombers. While there are a few of these pricier treasures in private hangars, they often demand resources that only a diverse and well-funded organization can provide.

    When it comes to WWII airplanes, few are bigger and none are more complex than the Boeing B-29 Superfortress. I recently had an opportunity to get an up-close look at FIFI, the only airworthy B-29 in the world. The airplane was at the Vintage Flying Museum in Fort Worth, Texas undergoing off-season maintenance. Just by seeing the huge airplane in the hangar with its massive engines uncowled, it was immediately obvious that it takes a tremendous operation to keep her flying. I later spoke with Kim Pardon and Brad Pilgrim from the Commemorative Air Force (CAF), the nonprofit organization that has owned and operated FIFI for more than 40 years. They were able to provide an insider's perspective of what's involved to keep FIFI in the air year after year.

    Rininger – Keeping FIFI airworthy is a huge financial commitment. All things considered, each hour of flight costs about $10,000. (Photo courtesy Tyson Rininger/Commemorative Air Force)

    Learning About FIFI

    The CAF has numerous WWII-era aircraft operating from various airports around the country…including other 4-engined bombers. Yet, FIFI is the only airplane in your fleet that has a full-time crew. What is it about this airplane that demands the extra resources?

    Brad Pilgrim - FIFI is probably the most maintenance intensive airplane in the CAF's fleet. In order to keep up with the required maintenance and the flying schedule, we have to keep a couple of full-time mechanics on staff.

    Kim Pardon - FIFI is also the only CAF aircraft that generates the kind of revenue it takes to sustain this level of maintenance. Most other CAF aircraft rely primarily on volunteer maintenance. The organization has a lot of dedicated and talented volunteers. Because we (the B-29 crew) travel almost 24 weeks a year we rely heavily on our paid maintenance staff to travel with us and help us fulfill all of our tour obligations.

    Tested Chats with Dr. David Miller, NASA's Chief Technologist

    Earlier this year, we had the privilege of chatting with Dr. David Miller, NASA's Chief Technologist, on our Still Untitled podcast. Dr. Miller joined us as part of the Bay Area Science Festival's trip to Alcatraz, where we recorded this podcast episode in front of a live audience. We discussed a wide range of topics, including Dr. Miller's role at NASA, the technological challenges of a Mars mission, the search for Earth-like planets, and much more. Below is a transcript of our conversation, edited for clarity. You can also watch the video of this podcast recording here!

    Will Smith: Welcome to Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project. I'm Will.

    Adam Savage: I'm Adam.

    Norman Chan: And I'm Norm.

    Will Smith: Joining us today we have a very special guest from NASA. We have the CTO of NASA, Dave Miller, joining us. Thank you so much for coming by, Dave.

    David Miller: Thanks for having me, and I can't think of a better place to talk about space exploration than The Rock.

    Norman Chan: Dave, you are the Chief Technologist of NASA--the CTO. Can you give us a little explanation of what you do and what you oversee?

    David Miller: When I first arrived, they told me it's an up and out organization, and I had no clue what that meant. But it really means that is that I focus on long-term strategy and things like technology transfer, how we interact with other companies and transfer the technology we do. We also track emerging space. We also roadmap the various technologies we're going to do. Probably most important, is advising the administrator on all things technology. There's a good, sort of, comparison I can make from The Martian... Who's seen The Martian? Who's read the book? Even better still, that's good. In there, I think he declares himself a space pirate, so let me use that as a way to describe who I am.

    I think of myself as the parrot on the pirate's shoulder. I provide advice to the leadership in the agency, and as long as I keep giving good advice, I stay on that shoulder.

    Adam Savage: It's like, "Awk, want to use ion engines!"