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    Tested In-Depth: Building a PC with Haswell-E, X99, DDR4

    We sit down to discuss some of the latest new technologies available to desktop PC building, including Intel's eight core Haswell-E CPU, X99 motherboards, DDR4 memory, and PCIe storage. While most of these high-end components are impractical for home PC builds and even gaming, we prescribe some picks for what upgrades make the most sense for PC builders.

    Haswell-E PC Build and Testing Preview

    Will's gone this week to Portland's XOXO conference, so no Mystery 3D Print this week. Instead, Norm invites you back to his home office to preview a new PC build he's working on for testing. It's a system based on Intel's new high-end Haswell-E processor, which introduces a new chipset and our first encounter with DDR4 RAM!

    Tested In-Depth: 3D Printing with Printrbot Simple Metal

    After building the Printrbot Simple Metal a month ago, Will takes it home to tweak and test its printing capabilities. We sit down to discuss the current state of home 3D printers, best practices for getting good prints, and several modifications and add-ons to make the Printrbot even better!

    Tested In-Depth: Sony RX100 III Compact Camera

    We sit down to discuss Sony's latest high-end compact camera, the RX100 Mark III. Having tested both predecessors to this model, we evaluate its new features like the electronic viewfinder and improved zoom lens, as well as its image quality compared to big DSLR cameras. Here's why it's one of our favorite new cameras to use!

    Show and Tell: Star Wars Imperial Probe Droid Project

    For this week's Show and Tell, Norm invites you back into his home office to check out two of his new favorite things--both Star Wars themed! The first is a great Death Star rug from Thinkgeek, and the second is a 1/6th scale Imperial Probe Droid model that Norm has upgraded with some minor hacking.

    Show and Tell: LEGO Ideas Research Institute

    For this week's Show and Tell, Norm snags a new LEGO kit that sold out in just one day: the Research Institute minifies set that was designed through LEGO's user-submitted Ideas program. Here's why we wish LEGO would release more of these sets.

    Tested In-Depth: Amazon Fire Phone

    We were curious when Amazon announced their Fire phone, and intrigued by the Dynamic Perspective and Firefly features that Amazon claims sets its handset apart from other flagship smartphones. So we bought a Fire phone to test and show you how those features work--or rather, how they don't really work well. Here's why we couldn't wait to return this phone for a refund after testing.

    Show and Tell: Favorite Exercise Armband

    For this week's Show and Tell, Will reviews the Tuneband, his favorite athletic armband to use with his iPhone while jogging. It's secure enough so that it doesn't flap around when you're in motion, but also keeps your phone at a good position where it doesn't get in the way of your arm movements.

    Tested In-Depth: Nvidia Shield Tablet and Wireless Controller

    Nvidia's first Shield device was a good showcase of the Tegra 4 processor, but was limited as a dedicated gaming device. We test the new Shield Tablet and wireless controller, and show off its gaming and productivity features. We also evaluate the stylus, Nvidia's new Grid Beta, and Shield's built-in Twitch streaming capabilities. This ends up being one of our favorite Android tablets, with few compromises for all of its features.

    Tested In-Depth: Microsoft Surface Pro 3

    Will and Norm sit down to discuss the new Microsoft Surface Pro 3. We compare it to previous Surface Pro devices and how it fares as both a laptop and tablet alternative. The one thing we like the most about it: note-taking with the pen digitizer is a lovely experience.

    Show and Tell: Laptop Screen Privacy Filter

    For today's Show and Tell, Will shares his method for preventing unwanted eyes from seeing what's on his laptop screen. He uses a 3M privacy filter attachment on top of his MacBook Air, which restricts the viewing angle to just the person using the laptop. Where would you use this kind of technology?

    Tested In-Depth: Oculus Rift Development Kit 2 (with Game Demos!)

    We have the Oculus VR Development Kit in the office (two of them!) and have been testing them for over a week. We sit down to discuss the new hardware, compare it to our first development kit, and then run through as many game demos as we can get working. Couch Knights multiplayer! Elite: Dangerous with a HOTAS setup!

    Show and Tell: The Curta Calculator

    Inventern champ Sean Charlesworth joins us in the Tested office this week to share one of his prized possessions: a Curta mechanical calculator. Designed in the 1940s before electronic calculators, this hand-cranked device was considered the the most precise pocket calculator available, and was used by rally car drivers and aviators.

    Tested In-Depth: Android Wear LG G Watch

    Will and Norm sit down to discuss Google's Android Wear platform, testing the new LG G Watch, and compare Google's smart watch to our experience living with the Pebble Steel watch. Here's why we think smart watches have the potential to be really useful accessories for smartphones.

    Show and Tell: LEGO Mystery Build #8

    We saw many new LEGO kits announced at this past Comic-Con, so what better to celebrate that than a LEGO mystery build! This week's kit is an official LEGO one that was actually designed by a Tested reader. Place your best guess as to what's being built in the comments!

    Show and Tell: Favorite Slim Wallet

    For this week's Show and Tell, Will shares his pick for his favorite slim wallet. The Bellroy Card Sleeve wallet keeps his pocket bulk to a minimum, and the leather has aged well over the two months Will has been testing it. Are you someone who keeps your wallet in the back or front pocket?

    Show and Tell: LEGO Mystery Build #7

    Time for another mystery LEGO build! This week's kit comes from one of Norm's favorite custom LEGO designers, and is a wonderful tribute to an important piece of computer history. Place your best guess as to what's being built in the comments!

    Testing: OnePlus One Android Smartphone

    We just posted our OnePlus One phone review, and I wanted to distill some of those thoughts in a post for anyone searching on Google or looking to find more information about the phone. As I said in the video, this is one of the best Android phones I've ever used. It's faster than the HTC One M8 and costs less off-contract than even Google's Nexus 5. And as of today, I'm still using it as my primary phone, as the benefits of its awesome battery life outweighs the disadvantages of its massive size.

    Aside from its price, here are some of my positive take-aways from testing the OnePlus One.

    1080p is lovely for a 5.5-inch screen. I've seen the LG G3 in person, and couldn't tell the difference between icons, text, and photos on that high-density screen and the images on my 5-inch 1080p Nexus 5. Only 1400p video was noticeably better. The OnePlus One also has a 5.5-inch screen, but 1080p suits it just fine. In a blind test (covering up the bezels), text and photos on OnePlus looked indistinguishable from those on the Nexus 5, reinforcing my opinion 1080p is an optimal resolution for smartphones.

    The camera is top-notch. One of the reason's I'm sticking with the OnePlus over the Nexus 5. It has a smartphone camera that I actually want to use on a regular basis. I haven't felt that way about a smartphone camera since switching over to Android from the iPhone 5. The 13MP Sony camera takes great HDR photos in good light conditions. Low light photos tax the shutter, and photos can get blown out if shooting toward the light source. I'm just a little bummed by the heavy JPEG compression, and am looking forward to Android L's RAW support. Also, shooting 4K video actually makes sense on this phone because I can pipe it directly to YouTube, which supports 4K video playback. (These still aren't clips I'm going to sync back to my desktop to edit.)

    Battery life is unbelievably great. The big win for OnePlus. The OnePlus One is the first phone I've used that I haven't been able to fully drain in a day without forcing it. Outside of a video playback test where I was streaming a high-def video over a cellular connection, the OnePlus has never gone below 25% battery in any day I've used it. I'm a pretty heavily phone user, and use several milestones throughout the day to gauge battery depletion--when I get to the office, noon, early afternoon, and leaving work. With my use, the battery on other phones typically dip below 70% by noon, but it takes until 3pm or so to get to that point on the OnePlus. It's been consistently above 35% by the time I reach home at around 7:30pm.

    Tested In-Depth: OnePlus One Android Smartphone

    We test the new high-end Android smartphone from OnePlus that's unique because it comes with Cyanogen built-in, and only costs $300 off-contract. And with a 5.5-inch screen, it's also one of the largest phones we've used. Here's what you need to know about the OnePlus One if you're vying for an invite for buy it.