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    Show and Tell: Favorite Slim Wallet

    For this week's Show and Tell, Will shares his pick for his favorite slim wallet. The Bellroy Card Sleeve wallet keeps his pocket bulk to a minimum, and the leather has aged well over the two months Will has been testing it. Are you someone who keeps your wallet in the back or front pocket?

    Show and Tell: LEGO Mystery Build #7

    Time for another mystery LEGO build! This week's kit comes from one of Norm's favorite custom LEGO designers, and is a wonderful tribute to an important piece of computer history. Place your best guess as to what's being built in the comments!

    Testing: OnePlus One Android Smartphone

    We just posted our OnePlus One phone review, and I wanted to distill some of those thoughts in a post for anyone searching on Google or looking to find more information about the phone. As I said in the video, this is one of the best Android phones I've ever used. It's faster than the HTC One M8 and costs less off-contract than even Google's Nexus 5. And as of today, I'm still using it as my primary phone, as the benefits of its awesome battery life outweighs the disadvantages of its massive size.

    Aside from its price, here are some of my positive take-aways from testing the OnePlus One.

    1080p is lovely for a 5.5-inch screen. I've seen the LG G3 in person, and couldn't tell the difference between icons, text, and photos on that high-density screen and the images on my 5-inch 1080p Nexus 5. Only 1400p video was noticeably better. The OnePlus One also has a 5.5-inch screen, but 1080p suits it just fine. In a blind test (covering up the bezels), text and photos on OnePlus looked indistinguishable from those on the Nexus 5, reinforcing my opinion 1080p is an optimal resolution for smartphones.

    The camera is top-notch. One of the reason's I'm sticking with the OnePlus over the Nexus 5. It has a smartphone camera that I actually want to use on a regular basis. I haven't felt that way about a smartphone camera since switching over to Android from the iPhone 5. The 13MP Sony camera takes great HDR photos in good light conditions. Low light photos tax the shutter, and photos can get blown out if shooting toward the light source. I'm just a little bummed by the heavy JPEG compression, and am looking forward to Android L's RAW support. Also, shooting 4K video actually makes sense on this phone because I can pipe it directly to YouTube, which supports 4K video playback. (These still aren't clips I'm going to sync back to my desktop to edit.)

    Battery life is unbelievably great. The big win for OnePlus. The OnePlus One is the first phone I've used that I haven't been able to fully drain in a day without forcing it. Outside of a video playback test where I was streaming a high-def video over a cellular connection, the OnePlus has never gone below 25% battery in any day I've used it. I'm a pretty heavily phone user, and use several milestones throughout the day to gauge battery depletion--when I get to the office, noon, early afternoon, and leaving work. With my use, the battery on other phones typically dip below 70% by noon, but it takes until 3pm or so to get to that point on the OnePlus. It's been consistently above 35% by the time I reach home at around 7:30pm.

    Tested In-Depth: OnePlus One Android Smartphone

    We test the new high-end Android smartphone from OnePlus that's unique because it comes with Cyanogen built-in, and only costs $300 off-contract. And with a 5.5-inch screen, it's also one of the largest phones we've used. Here's what you need to know about the OnePlus One if you're vying for an invite for buy it.

    Tested In-Depth: Pebble Steel Smart Watch

    What's the point of a smart watch, and how does it complement your use of a smartphone? That's what we wanted to figure out in our testing of the Pebble Steel. Will and Norm both use the Pebble for a month and discuss how it changes the way they regularly interact with their iOS and Android phones.

    Tested In-Depth: Adobe Ink and Slide Review

    Has anyone ever used a good stylus for the iPad? We sit down to discuss the fundamental problems with writing with a stylus on the iPad, and what tricks hardware companies use to make writing and drawing on the tablet feel as natural as possible. Plus, we test Adobe's new Ink and Slide hardware tools, as well as their new drawing apps.

    Show and Tell: Bonelab Skeleton Kits

    For this week's Show and Tell, Norm shares some amazing laser cut kits created by artist Greg Peltz. These Bonelab kits are single sheets of plastic that break out into interlocking puzzle pieces that assemble into beautifully recreated skeletons of animals. We show you the process of building one of these kits, and reveal a new kit that's Greg's most complex design so far.

    Show and Tell: RC Nano-Quadcopter

    More fun with remote controlled quadrotors! For this week's Show and Tell, Norm flies the Estes Proto X, a small nano-quad that's fun to fly indoors and a cheap way to get acquainted with the standard two-stick controls of a quadcopter.

    Show and Tell: Intel's NUC Mini PC

    For this week's Show and Tell, Will tests Intel's NUC "Next Unit of Computing" small form-factor computer. This tiny box is a full-fledged PC, running on Intel's current-gen Haswell processor and integrated graphics. With low power consumption and the ability to mount of a back of a television, it can be a great home theater streaming PC or light gaming machine.

    Show and Tell: Romo 2.0 Telepresence Robot

    We tested the first Romo robot almost two years ago, and just got our hands on the new version, a fun telepresense toy that works right out of the box. It's a simple rover that uses an iOS device as its brains, and can execute programmed commands or be controlled remotely.

    Tested In-Depth: HTC One M8 Smartphone

    Will and Norm sit down to review HTC's new flagship Android smartphone. The HTC One (M8) is the successor to the phone that got Norm to switch from iOS to Android, and it has a few new features that differentiate it from phones like Google's Nexus 5.

    Tested In-Depth: Amazon Fire TV Streaming Media Player

    We sit down to review and discuss of Amazon's new streaming media player, the Fire TV. We test its voice control and gaming capabilities and demo some unique video playback features.Here's how this set-top box compares with Apple TV, the Roku 3, and other dedicated living room devices when it comes to streaming video from the most popular video services.

    Testing: Logitech G502 Proteus Core Gaming Mouse

    Wait, wasn't it just one year ago that Logitech released the G500s, the rebirth of its venerated G5 line of gaming mice? Hold on for just a second while I check my review. Yep, that was just last March. But here we are, with another new high-end gaming mouse, the G502. And this year, Logitech's given it a fancy moniker: the Proteus Core. I'm not sure if that's meant to evoke a certain StarCraft faction in gamers' minds, or simply a take on the SAT-friendly word 'protean', meaning versatile or adaptable. The latter's likely the case, given the G502's ability to be calibrated for different mousing surfaces (glass and mirrors notwithstanding). Regardless, Logitech's new flagship is an aggressive product, an $80 mouse that not only succeeds last year's G500s, but revamps the design of Logitech's gaming mouse line. That curvy G5 design that I was so hot on last year has once again been retired (at least temporarily).

    I've been testing the G502 for about a week, in first-person shooters, real-time strategy games, and lots of desktop imaging work. I'm not a MOBA player, so my perspective may not reflect those playing the dominant PC gaming game type today. And as I've said before, a gaming mouse is an accessory that most people rarely change--they find the one that works for them and stick with it. If you like the Razer DeathAdder, Mad Catz R.A.T., or even Logitech's own previous G-series, mice, there's really not a lot of reason to spend another $80 on a new gaming mouse unless your current one breaks. Gaming mice technology has really reached a point where every new generation of product offers fewer new benefits; product engineers really feel like they're reaching when they push the boundaries of sensor DPI or add more configurable buttons. And the G502 has plenty of those new back-of-box features, for sure. Let's run through them and evaluate whether they truly add any benefit to your gaming experience.

    Arguably the most important component in a gaming mouse is its sensor, and the G502's optical (IR) sensor was apparently designed from the ground up to introduce two notable features. The first is DPI (dots per inch, or technically counts per inch) sensitivity that ranges from 200 to 12000. You read that correctly: this mouse is sensitive to past 10,000 DPI, which I believe is a first for a gaming mouse. (Consider that the G5, circa 2005, topped out at 2000 DPI). At that maximum setting, the tiniest flick of the wrist will send the cursor all the way across a 1080p panel; it's meant for gamers who want to make extremely large movements quickly, or desktop users running multiple monitors spanning many thousands of pixels wide. Of course, high DPI doesn't denote accuracy, just sensitivity. A mouse set to 10,000 DPI isn't useful if it isn't accurate at that "resolution"--the trick is testing the mouse's accuracy at the sensitivities that you find most useful.

    Tested In-Depth: Sony a7 Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera

    Will and Norm sit down and chat about testing the Sony a7 mirrorless camera. It's the smallest interchangeable lens camera with a full-frame sensor, which means it's comparable to high-end Canon and Nikon DSLRs, but is much more portable. Find test and sample photos from this review here.