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    Tested In-Depth: Moto X (2014)

    After testing the new Moto X Android smartphone for a month, Will and Norm sit to down to discuss how its three most important features: the display, camera, and battery life compare against today's top Android phones. How does Motorola's spin on Android compare to the stock version? Plus, does the custom wood back look and feel any good?

    Show and Tell: Bluetooth Hands-Free Car Adapter

    For this week's Show and Tell, Will shares his current solution for playing back music and making calls from his phone in his car. While his car has an auxiliary audio jack, he prefers using this Kinivo hands-free receiver as an intermediary. Its decent audio, built-in micrphone, and music playback controls are why it's Will's pick for an aftermarket car Bluetooth solution. What do you use to listen to music from your smartphone while driving?

    Hot Toys Batman Armory 1/6th Scale Figure Set

    Bonus weekend video! Norm shares a new sixth scale collectible figure set he just received: the highly-anticipated Batman Armory set from Hot Toys! This set not only has the armory display, but Batman, Bruce Wayne, and Alfred figures as well. Norm analyzes the quality of these sculpts and paint jobs, and compares this newest Batman model to past versions. No detail goes unnoticed!

    Tested In-Depth: Mac OS X 10.10 Yosemite

    Mac OS X Yosemite is out today! We've been running and testing the various betas leading up to the final release, and sit down to discuss what's new and noteworthy in the latest version of Apple's desktop and laptop operating system. There's more than just a few cosmetic changes!

    Show and Tell: Ultimate Ears Boom Speakers

    For this week's Show and Tell, Will tests Logitech's Ultimate Ears Boom, a step up from the mini Bluetooth speaker we reviewed last year. The larger speaker is durable and meant to be used on the road, like for camping trips. Its 15-hour battery can last a weeklong road trip, but it's also great for backyard use.

    Tested In-Depth: Windows 10 Technical Preview

    The next release of Windows is going to be...Windows 10. We install the Technical Preview and show off the its new features, including refined touch on the Desktop, new multiple Desktop management, and the return of the Start Menu! This is software we don't recommend running on production systems, but we like what we see so far!

    Show and Tell: Astro A38 Bluetooth Headset

    For this week's Show and Tell, Will shares a new bluetooth headset that he's been testing: Astro Gaming's A38. While the company is known for its gaming headphones, these wireless headsets are made to be worn outside the home, with good active noise-cancellation. Here's what Will thinks about them after some use.

    Testing Nvidia's GeForce GTX 980 Video Card

    The final piece of Norm's new Haswell-E system build is the graphics card, and as it turns out, Nvidia has just released its new GeForce 900 series of GPUs. We run through what's new in the high-end Maxwell architecture, how the GTX 980 performs, and give recommendations for practical upgrades. What graphics card are you currently using, what screen resolution do you run at, and do you play games with AA turned on?

    Tested In-Depth: iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus

    After living with the new iPhone 6 Plus for a while, Will sits down with Norm to discuss the merits of Apple's biggest smartphone. How well does iOS 8 work on a 5.5-inch screen? Does the stabilized camera and extra battery life matter? We compare the new iPhone models and help Will decide if he wants to stick with the Plus or return it.

    Testing: The Moto 360 Android Wear Smartwatch

    Android Wear was announced way back in March of 2014, but it wasn't until July that we could actually buy smartwatches running Google's wearable software. The LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live were capable watches, but they weren't jaw dropping in terms of their design--rectangular screens on a plastic band. These debut devices were perhaps best as demos of Android Wear--a hint of what was to come. Now the Motorola Moto 360 has arrived, and while it's still in short supply, units are slowly are slowly trickling out for excited Android fans.

    The internet waited through six solid months of buildup for this device with its round LCD, but was it worth the wait? I've been using the Moto 360 every day for a month, having forsaken my G Watch, and have learned some interesting things about Motorola's latest wearable. Here's what you should know before you decide to slap one on your wrist.

    The Screen is Great, and Not Just Because it's Round

    The Moto 360's defining characteristic is the screen--it's round. All previous smartwatches (even those before Android Wear) have been square. Round LCDs have been rare throughout the history of mobile technology partially because they're harder to manufacture, but also because they aren't as usable in most cases. One notable example of the round screen was the Motorola Aura, a luxury feature phone released in 2008 for over $2000. We've come a long way.

    The Moto 360's display is striking, with a beveled edge, clean lines, and narrow bezels. The resolution is 320x280, which is okay for a device that's 1.56-inches in diameter. If you stick it up next to your face, you can make out the pixels, but farther away you can't. The thing about the Moto 360's screen you might not know is that it's overall gorgeous. The resolution simply doesn't tell the whole story.

    The LCD is gapless and right up next to the glass, giving the 360 almost perfect viewing angles. The colors are also vibrant by LCD standards. The 360's screen is very bright too. One of the failings of the LG G Watch is that the brightness is rather mediocre, even at maximum. That makes it a little tough to see outdoors, but the Moto 360 shines brightly. It even has an ambient light that automatically adjusts the brightness so you can see in indoors and out.

    The light sensor brings us to the "flat tire." That's the internet euphemism for the slice missing from the display at the bottom. It's about 5mm tall and completely black. This is where the ambient light sensor peeks out, as well as the area where the display connects to the mainboard inside the watch. Motorola explains this was a necessary compromise to avoid having a larger bezel. I'll admit this is a bit off-putting at first, but you get used to it. Some watch faces don't take into account the gap, though, which makes it look worse.

    Show and Tell: The Useless Box Kit

    For this week's Show and Tell, Norm assembles a kit of a machine he's always wanted: a useless box. Flip the switch on the box and all it does is turn itself off. Simple, yet mesmerizing. The kit of laser cut plastic and some basic electronics isn't difficult to put together, and makes for a great afternoon project.

    Tested In-Depth: Desktop 3D Scanning and 3D Printing

    We've been experimenting with home 3D printers for a while, but we now finally have a desktop 3D scanner at the office too! We test the new Matter and Form 3D scanner that digitizes any small object, generating a 3D model and file that we can then send over to our 3D printer. Here's what worked well and what didn't--let's see if we can replicate Norm's head!

    iPhone 6 Plus Impressions and Most Common Questions Answered

    We're in the process of testing the Apple iPhone 6 Plus for our in-depth review, but wanted to show you how the phone compares to previous iPhones and other Android phones, as well as some distinguishing physical characteristics. We also answer the most commonly asked questions about the phone, including battery life, camera, and whether it bends.

    Testing: Blade 350 QX2 AP Combo Quadcopter Review

    I’ve been flying an original DJI Phantom quadrotor for almost two years. Even though it’s never given me an ounce of trouble, watching the super-stable video footage from quads equipped with camera gimbals convinced me that I needed an upgrade. Rather than add a gimbal to my Phantom, I decided to keep it as a sport flyer and add a new quad to my fleet. The new ship is a Blade 350QX2 AP Combo (~$900). Its features are similar to the Phantom 2 Vision + reviewed by Norm and Will, but there are a several differences. I will talk about those variances throughout this review.

    The Blade 350QX series is not new. It was first released in the summer of 2013. Like the Phantom, the 350QX lineup has seen continuous improvements and added options. The AP Combo is the first 350QX equipped with a 2-axis gimbal and a camera. Blade brand quads and helicopters are quite popular, so you are likely to find kits and spare parts at your local hobby shop.

    What’s In the Box

    The AP Combo is a turnkey setup. It includes the factory-built quad, a Spektrum DX4 transmitter, the gimbal, a 3-cell 3000mAh LiPo battery, and an AC charger for the battery. The only thing I had to add was a micro-SD card for the GoPro-like CGO1 camera. I used a SanDisk 16GB class 10 card. The quad was 95% ready to fly when I opened the box. Even the props were installed (a full extra set is included as well).

    The one required assembly step was to snap the gimbal unit into place on the bottom of the quad. If you’re not paying attention, it can be installed backwards. Trust me on that. If it doesn’t click into place easily, you’re doing it wrong. Retreat, regroup, and charge again. While I was working on the gimbal, I had the flight battery and camera charging on their respective chargers. The camera charges through a micro-USB cable (included).

    The Blade 350QX2 AP Combo includes everything except a micro-SD card for the camera. Very little assembly is required.

    Blade includes a Quick Start Guide to lead you through the necessary steps to get the quad in the air. It is easy to follow and understand. A full manual is available online as are numerous videos. I found the online videos especially helpful. Since I had watched several of them while the quad was being shipped, I already knew what to expect when I opened the box.

    The battery connectors are the popular EC3 style that is included with most Blade products as well as the other house brands distributed by Horizon Hobby (E-flite, Parkzone, ECX, Losi, Vaterra, etc.). They work fine and there is no reason to replace them. However, all of my RC equipment is configured with Deans Ultra Plugs. For the sake of consistency, I swapped the EC3s on the 350QX2 for Deans.

    Tested In-Depth: Building a PC with Haswell-E, X99, DDR4

    We sit down to discuss some of the latest new technologies available to desktop PC building, including Intel's eight core Haswell-E CPU, X99 motherboards, DDR4 memory, and PCIe storage. While most of these high-end components are impractical for home PC builds and even gaming, we prescribe some picks for what upgrades make the most sense for PC builders.

    Haswell-E PC Build and Testing Preview

    Will's gone this week to Portland's XOXO conference, so no Mystery 3D Print this week. Instead, Norm invites you back to his home office to preview a new PC build he's working on for testing. It's a system based on Intel's new high-end Haswell-E processor, which introduces a new chipset and our first encounter with DDR4 RAM!

    Tested In-Depth: 3D Printing with Printrbot Simple Metal

    After building the Printrbot Simple Metal a month ago, Will takes it home to tweak and test its printing capabilities. We sit down to discuss the current state of home 3D printers, best practices for getting good prints, and several modifications and add-ons to make the Printrbot even better!

    Tested In-Depth: Sony RX100 III Compact Camera

    We sit down to discuss Sony's latest high-end compact camera, the RX100 Mark III. Having tested both predecessors to this model, we evaluate its new features like the electronic viewfinder and improved zoom lens, as well as its image quality compared to big DSLR cameras. Here's why it's one of our favorite new cameras to use!

    Show and Tell: Star Wars Imperial Probe Droid Project

    For this week's Show and Tell, Norm invites you back into his home office to check out two of his new favorite things--both Star Wars themed! The first is a great Death Star rug from Thinkgeek, and the second is a 1/6th scale Imperial Probe Droid model that Norm has upgraded with some minor hacking.

    Show and Tell: LEGO Ideas Research Institute

    For this week's Show and Tell, Norm snags a new LEGO kit that sold out in just one day: the Research Institute minifies set that was designed through LEGO's user-submitted Ideas program. Here's why we wish LEGO would release more of these sets.