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frytup/frytup's Profile
  • frytup commented on Tested: Microsoft Windows 10 Pro

    Taskbar icons so tiny. So very tiny.

  • frytup commented on Lego with Friends: Phil Broughton, Part 4

    "My key ring bottle opener is bigger than yours." :)

  • frytup commented on Tested In-Depth: Apple 12-Inch MacBook (2015)

    @AnthonyP-: The semi-official explanation was lack of Broadwell chips powerful enough for the 15" models. Assuming that's true, I'd expect Intel to get them out in time for a summer refresh.

  • AnthonyP- mentioned you in Tested In-Depth: Apple 12-Inch MacBook (2015)

    @frytup: I'm taking the lack of a 15" Pro update as a sign that Apple are planning to add Thunderbolt 3 ports, which would mean the earliest a refresh could be is Q4.

  • Dr. V mentioned you in Making Butter Burgers at America's Test Kitchen!

    Agreed @frytup .

  • frytup commented on Making Butter Burgers at America's Test Kitchen!

    @Dr. V: Depends on the quality of the butter, of course. Higher end stuff will have higher fat-to-water content.

    But, really, this recipe isn't shocking. It would surprise most people to see how much butter is used by professional chefs. It's a classic restaurant trick to make everything taste better.

  • frytup commented on Tested In-Depth: Apple 12-Inch MacBook (2015)

    Quite annoyed they didn't update the 15" Pro. Hopefully this summer.

  • frytup commented on This Is Not Financial Advice - 4/28/2015

    Eh... I've listened to a couple of Dave Ramsey shows and just can't tolerate his right wing moralizing. He also gives some rather silly advice to people living in a high-value housing market like California. Don't buy a house unless you can do it on a 15-year loan? Haha... good one.

    I've had credit cards since I was 18. I have never carried a balance beyond the monthly payment date and never paid interest. This is partly because my parents had me paying bills and looking at account statements years before I went to college, and partly because I can do basic arithmetic and I'm not an idiot. At no point did I ever think a bank was likely to forget about the money they gave me,

  • Vertigus mentioned you in Episode 284 - A New Cohost Appears - 1/15/2015

    @frytup: Wow, that is a great deal of information and he does go on a bit. I'm not an engineer but I took a few physics courses and understanding some of his points from that view I might question the merits of 192kHz resolution. The real problem is it's very tough to get a good demonstration of the difference without some very particular choices. All of which may bias the results.

    I will tell you one experience that threw me over the wall on the topic. I bought a TASCAM DR-07MKII Digital Audio Recorder. It had 44.1kHz/48kHz/96kHz options as well as 16/24 bit choices for recording. I took it out to a forest area and started recording birds. Choosing each file storage type as I went, I made the same type of recording and then started another and changed the file option.

    The difference from the 48kHz 16 bit to the 96kHz 24 bit was jaw dropping. With the 48kHz 16 bit I felt like I was listening to a recording, with the 96kHz 24 bit It was like I was dropped in the middle of the forest at that moment in time. It was dramatic and spectacular. I get similar effect from some music files today. I could be delusional that my physiology is actually able to sort the quality jump, but if I am no one help me snap out of it.

  • Coda mentioned you in Why NASA's Orion Mission is So Important

    @frytup I speculate that Boeing has close links with other huge corporations and the US government <takes a look at its Board of Directors list> and SpaceX is more immune from bureaucratic fiddling.

  • MantaBase mentioned you in Why NASA's Orion Mission is So Important

    @frytup said:

    But that begs the question... why? Why is NASA developing SLS while SpaceX is working on a heavy lift rocket in parallel?

    I think that is an awsome question. Let's ask a similar one. Why is SpaceX developing a heavy lifter when NASA (or rather NASA contractors) are already doing it?

    But here are some possible reasons NASA is doing what it is doing (and honesty- I am speculating):

    SpaceX is under no real obligation to finish that project. Nor have they proven (yet) they can do it cheaper and better. But keep in mind, in this case, I think Boeing is designing the Block 1 and 2 lifters for Orion (someone can correct me). So, it's still a private comapny making them.

    Assuming I am correct, the question becomes, why is Boeing working on a heavy lifter when SpaceX is working on one? Because they are companies competing with each other. And SpaceX thinks they can do a better job.

    I first heard of companies privately developing delivery systems (without contracts) in 1997 at a conference. It is approaching 2 decades since and now we are seeing real progress from companies or ventures. Should NASA sit on it's hands and wait for a decade while private ventures offer solutions (maybe)? I personally don't think so. Let SpaceX bring it's proven product to market (with NASA's cooperation), and if it is better, then we use it. IN the mean time, don't stall progress while we let a dream catch up. If the SpaceX system is what it should be - it will fly.

    Disclosure: I have financial interests in SpaceX

  • tertius mentioned you in Why NASA's Orion Mission is So Important

    @frytup: We'll probably get a better set of rockets systems out of SpaceX and NASA competing a bit with each other than we would have with only one or the other.

  • exnasaguy mentioned you in Why NASA's Orion Mission is So Important

    @frytup said:

    But that begs the question... why? Why is NASA developing SLS while SpaceX is working on a heavy lift rocket in parallel?

    At the risk of alienating friends who are still at NASA, I'll just say that I don't necessarily understand or agree with numerous high-level decisions made by/for the agency...dating back to cancelling Constellation. That said, I sincerely hope that the choices made will pan out as intended. Overall, I'm way too biased and grumpy on the matter to provide any useful, logical input. Y'all feel free to discuss without me.

  • grorc mentioned you in President Obama's Announces Net Neutrality Plan

    @frytup: yeah... Congress in general will make sure Comcast gets what they want. Will's posts says it all, there's a frickin Cable company lobbyist in charge of the FCC!

  • Regal mentioned you in Tested In-Depth: Mac OS X 10.10 Yosemite

    @frytup said:

    @Regal said:

    @frytup said:

    @Jensonb said:

    I don't think I will ever understand people who want the browser cluttered up with nonsense like the full URL showing at all times. Frankly, unless I'm specifically interacting with the chrome, I want as little as possible of it to show onscreen. Fortunately for me, Apple seems to agree...Safari on my iPad as I type this is showing nothing but the system info bar and a single line of text that says "tested.com".

    Philosophical differences. I hate the "clean" look. The more information the better.

    Example - my favorite OS X add-on is iStat Menus.

    If he who likes to see the url is the same kind of person who would use all those 'system monitoring' graphs, then the aesthetic divide is indeed a wide one.

    I don't think it's as much about ‘clean’ as it is about focus. The reduction of the chrome, and the translucency of it, is made to bring forth the content as the object of attention. And I think it works. Do you really need to know the temperature of your CPU, or how fast the fans are spinning? I thought modern technology was supposed to be able to calibrate and adjust that by itself, and never have to intrude it upon you, the user.

    You don't "need" to do anything, of course. I just like to know what kind of network transfer speed I'm getting, which processes are spiking the CPU/using memory, why the fans are screaming at me, why my lap is on fire, etc.

    You see it as an annoyance. I see it as valuable and interesting information. As I said, philosophical differences. You're in luck, though. You're the ideal Apple customer, whereas I'm constantly trying to fight Apple's burning desire to hide low-level information from users.

    If your lap is burning, I can see why you'd need to diagnose the problem.

    I can only empathise when a flaw in the system necessitates such a mess.

    Wouldn’t it be ideal though, if the laptop was built right to begin with? A fanless Macbook will probably be released. It’d have the advantage of the iPad, like thermal stability, but on a more general purpose OS.

    I think we'd be on the same page in that hypothetical. Your position seems more like a compromise with limitations rather than a principle of design. Even though it may be unavoidable for some at this point in time.

  • Regal mentioned you in Tested In-Depth: Mac OS X 10.10 Yosemite

    @frytup said:

    @Jensonb said:

    I don't think I will ever understand people who want the browser cluttered up with nonsense like the full URL showing at all times. Frankly, unless I'm specifically interacting with the chrome, I want as little as possible of it to show onscreen. Fortunately for me, Apple seems to agree...Safari on my iPad as I type this is showing nothing but the system info bar and a single line of text that says "tested.com".

    Philosophical differences. I hate the "clean" look. The more information the better.

    Example - my favorite OS X add-on is iStat Menus.

    If he who likes to see the url is the same kind of person who would use all those 'system monitoring' graphs, then the aesthetic divide is indeed a wide one.

    I don't think it's as much about ‘clean’ as it is about focus. The reduction of the chrome, and the translucency of it, is made to bring forth the content as the object of attention. And I think it works. Do you really need to know the temperature of your CPU, or how fast the fans are spinning? I thought modern technology was supposed to be able to calibrate and adjust that by itself, and never have to intrude it upon you, the user.

  • tom032792 mentioned you in Apple Announces New iPads, Retina iMac, and Mac Mini

    @frytup said:

    @RemoveBeforeFlight said:

    iMacs seem pointless at this point since they're just using laptop components anyway.

    You might as well just get a MacBook Pro. It's portable and can still be used with a display if needed.

    Kinda depends how much you want that display. A MBP plus equivalent monitor (assuming you can even find it) would be almost double the price.

    While I don't think a whole lot of iMacs in general, they do use desktop processors in all but the lowest end ones, so for non-GPU heavy loads, they perform fairly comparably to a desktop.

  • kim_a mentioned you in How To Get Into Hobby RC: The Phantom Menace

    @frytup: In a similar vein, how about helicopters? It would seem that the same places that are ideal for flying something like the Phantom to capture cool video, i.e. an open space in the city that provides nice views but isn't close-up to residential buildings, is the same places where emergency services would land an ambulance helicopter in case of a significant emergency. Fair enough that the sirens and copter arent exactly stealthy in their approach, but if the pilot is a few hundred feet away from the Phantom, it isn't exactly an instant process to recapture or land the quad safely without causing a hindrance.

  • Sil3n7 mentioned you in Quadcopter Fun Flight Fridays #1

    @frytup said:

    Er... what's the max altitude of these things? From a pilot's perspective, a bunch of amateurs flying around with zero communications or awareness of aircraft traffic is scary as hell.

    Theres a not fly zone that is checked with GPS coordinates before flight is allowed as I understand it.

  • blather.more mentioned you in Tested: We Buy a Bitcoin!

    @frytup: The US doesn't have a central bank. So, I assume you keep your rubles or yen elsewhere.

    But -- I agree with you. Bitcoin is not a mature currency. I think of it like gambling. When I go to Vegas I bring some money that I plan to lose. Same with bitcoin. People should not invest in volatile and immature technology what they cannot lose.

  • PaulKemp mentioned you in Tested In-Depth: SteamOS Beta and In-Home Streaming

    @frytup said:

    I've had a Windows PC running Big Picture next to my TV for a couple of months now. Generally speaking, it works as you'd expect it to. Set it up so that Steam launches on boot, and it's a very console-like experience.

    The biggest annoyance is games that only partially support controllers, forcing you to walk over the the PC and do some uncomfortable mousing around at first launch. As devs clue in to BP, this is becoming less of a problem.

    I'd recommend getting an Xbox controller wireless adapter for Windows. Having a cable running to the PC gets old quick.

    Sweet. I was planning on getting both the Logitech K400 and a wireless xbox controller.

    Good to know, so there is not any problems with windows updates, applications forcing you back to the windows desktop? Like java updates etc.

  • will mentioned you in Test Notes: Installing SteamOS

    @frytup: It ships with general Xinput. It worked with the wireless dongle, but I haven't tried a wired controller yet.

  • bottleworks mentioned you in Premium: CES Trendspotting and Michael Bay's Breakdown

    @frytup: Thanks. It works great.

    I think I see why the playback is an issue. Large files coupled with reduced bandwidth. Downloading the video....I'm only getting around 300KB/sec. It's not my end which is causing the slowdown. Maybe the server is overloaded?