Drill recommendations???

Created by badatdrawingmodelmaker on May 22, 2015, 10:52 a.m.
  • Hi,

    I'm 13 and my current 18v cordless has finally died and I'd love people recommendations on a good quality under £150 or $235 drill. It'll mostly be used for masonry and wood so it will have to be a combi.

    Thanks,

    Robbie

  • @badatdrawingmodelmaker: I'm also on the market for a new drill and have been looking at the Black&Decker Matrix (also called Evo or Multievo depending on where you are).

    Its a drill with interchangable head, so saw, drills, sander, pump and a few more all powered by the same base.

    http://www.blackanddecker.com/en-US/products/power-tools/portable-power-tools/power-tool-combo-kits/matrix-20v-max-lithium-drilldriver--jigsaw-combo-kit/bdcdmt120js

    This is a 20v version but in my corner of the word they sell the 18v

    http://www.blackanddecker.com/en-US/products/power-tools/portable-power-tools/matrix-attachments//params/1/12/newest/-/-/-/-/-/-/-

    As you can see you can built up a nice set over time...

  • @KylevT Thanks for the recomendation! Overall I think it's a good product idea but I think the interchangable heads would make me worry about the sturdiness of the product. As well as this, as Adam Savage frequently sais, don't trust a tool that sais it can do everything.

    I can though see that the sander atachment may come in hand but I'd again worry about the reliabilty of the product.

  • Oh this would never compare to a full tool but i like to see it as a nice stepping stone till you can afford the next tool to replace one of the heads ;) the heads are around $50 each

  • @badatdrawingmodelmaker:Yeah, Adam will say that, and yet he has a dremel instead of a set of high end jewelers rotary tools. Every rule

    If it is a tool you will be using constantly and for a long period of time (pushing 5+ years), then go for the highest quality you can afford over features.

    If it is a tool you will be using a dozen times a year on the other hand, go for moderate quality with multiple features. The versatility will pay off in spades.

    "Heirloom" quality tools are not what you should be looking at.in most cordless tools. They are not like handtools or table saws. You don't want to pay for a drill that will last 10+ years. It will be out of date in 5 years and batteries will start to get hard to find.

    Anyways, I like Black and Decker (own a set of FireStorms), but De Walt, Makita, and Milwaukee are all brands to look at for quality. They are contractor grade. I actually have a Kawasaki drill that has been great for me - but not sure they make anything good for masonry.

  • Opinions...

    http://www.screwfix.com/p/makita-dhp453rm-18v-4-0ah-li-ion-lxt-cordless-combi-drill/71790

    http://www.screwfix.com/p/dewalt-dcd776c3-18v-1-3ah-li-ion-cordless-combi-drill-xr/13165

  • While I will get that black+decker I've only heard good about DeWalt

  • @badatdrawingmodelmaker: Those are both good. Here is the question.

    What are your jobs like?

    The Makita is heavier and only has a single battery, but it is 4ah - it will last a long time on a single charge OR is better for long single drilling times and high torque - think fewer but tougher holes. The DeWalt is lighter (more comfortable) has 3 x 1.4ah batteries. Likely better if you are drilling a lot of holes in say wood. You can always have a battery charging and likely have very little down time. But tough holes may drain batteries quickly.

    So, for (a strange) example, if he task is using it as a driver for mounting aluminum siding on a trailer (tons of screws), go DeWalt. If the task is drilling a few holes in the steel trailer frame for mounting hardware - go Makita.

    BTW - Both drills will do the same tasks - but depending on what you do, one is better than the other.

  • As its mostly wood , I spose the dewalt would be better.

    Any other sugestions.?.?.?.

  • Bits, drill is just the muscle. The real power behind a good drill is a good set of bits

    And for wood a set of forstner bits is a must!

  • One thing to think about is what other tools you like by that brand. What I mean is I love my 18v Dewalt drill. I also own a cordless saw, hammer drill, sander and portable light that use the same 18v battery. I have one charging station with 4 Dewalt batteries that I can use in several different tools. I use Dewalt and Makita tools, can't go wrong with either. Personally, I would go with the Dewalt, I like how it fits in my hand, the ergonomics seem to be better. I actually have 3 Dewalt Drills...2 normal and one hammer drill. You won't regret it.

  • @KylevT: Yeah - I was actually going to recommend a drill doctor - http://www.drilldoctor.com/

    But I think it's overkill if it's mostly wood and he buys quality bits. Mine as already paid for itself. Bit's are important and even a low end drill will do well with good bits - and the highest quality one will do poorly with dull bits.

    Maybe I over think drills a bit (lol - pun). But I only get to buy a new one every 5 years or so. So I like to think I thought about it before I buy.

  • @DeanConnley said:

    One thing to think about is what other tools you like by that brand. What I mean is I love my 18v Dewalt drill. I also own a cordless saw, hammer drill, sander and portable light that use the same 18v battery. I have one charging station with 4 Dewalt batteries that I can use in several different tools.

    Well pointed out! This is why I originally bought into B&D FireStorm tools. I was worried that being lower end tools I might regret it - but I totally didn't. The ability to change out batteries between multiple tools has been a boon (even my trimmer uses the same battery) and they were first to do it that I could find. Alas, As B&D often has, they didn't keep up with an awesome thing and are no longer a good option for me in these tools as they near end of life. But they served me well (I managed an entire house addition despite the fact that the circular saw could only cut 2x4s). I still have the drill as a backup now and because it can quick switch chucks, I actually use it more than my good drill.

  • I've found it's far better to buy the low-end of a high-end/professional quality range of tools (like Dewalt) then to buy the high-end of a low-quality range of tools (like Black and Decker). I use Dewalt professionally at work and they are great drills, so I have one at home as well. You can buy a pro-level Dewalt in the $150 range. I bought my (non-hammer-drill) Dewalt drill second-hand but mint condition for $100. I wish I'd gotten the 20v though, the 20v batteries attach differently and balance better, at least the one at the shop at work does.

    I'll second the importance of bits - keep 'em sharp! You can learn to sharpen bits by hand on an ordinary bench grinder, I've done it and it's not hard, just something you have to practice until you get the hang of the skill. I have some training as a machinist, and I was really surprised when I started training to find that ordinary drill bits can drill through 1/2" inch steel quite easily. The main limiting factor on drilling is the movement of the drill and the materials - machining drill presses and mills are built heavy, rigid and sturdy for this very reason. All the fancy alloy-coated gold-colored coatings you see on drill bits sold in many stores are just marketing gimmicks - the coating is put there to cover the inferior or badly hardened steel underneath and to make the drill bits look good.

  • @KylevT@MantaBase@DeanConnley

    Think I've decided on this

    http://www.diy.com/departments/makita-cordless-18v-li-ion-combi-drill-2-batteries-hp457dwex2/278413_BQ.prd

    Any thoughts...

  • @badatdrawingmodelmaker

    That should be perfect! Have Fun!

  • Just a note, that Makita you posted that you have decided on is from their older range of tools and uses the old style batteries not the newer LXT labeled ones. The older ones are not compatible with any of the rest of the current range either in terms of batteries of tools. Wouldn't be my choice and I generally find that neither B+Q nor Screwfix have good prices for power tools. I would however recomend either of the two sites below.

    http://www.ffx.co.uk/

    http://www.lawson-his.co.uk/

  • Following on from that here is a choice from those sites that might suit -

    http://www.lawson-his.co.uk/makita-dhp453rfx-18v-li-ion-combi-drill-in-aluminium-carry-case-1-x-3-0ah

    It may only come with one battery but its more than double the capacity of the other (lasts way longer) and will charge in 22 minutes. Which if you've managed to run down the battery give you time for a cuppa.

  • @badatdrawingmodelmaker: https://powertoolstore.net/product-category/drilling-tools/

  • I have had my Dewalt XRP 18v drill that I have been using very hard for over 10 years now! Over the past year I have put in over 3000 self-drilling into 12 gage pipe doubled up. Plus the countless amount of deck screws, and holes drilled through wood, steel, and concrete (the XPR has a hammer-drill setting).
    I don't think I will ever buy a different brand, as long as they keep up their quality! :)

  • @MantaBase said:

    @badatdrawingmodelmaker:Yeah, Adam will say that, and yet he has a dremel instead of a set of high end jewelers rotary tools. Every rule

    If it is a tool you will be using constantly and for a long period of time (pushing 5+ years), then go for the highest quality you can afford over features.

    If it is a tool you will be using a dozen times a year on the other hand, go for moderate quality with multiple features. The versatility will pay off in spades.

    "Heirloom" quality tools are not what you should be looking at.in most cordless tools. They are not like handtools or table saws. You don't want to pay for a drill that will last 10+ years. It will be out of date in 5 years and batteries will start to get hard to find.

    Anyways, I like Black and Decker (own a set of FireStorms), but De Walt, Makita, and Milwaukee are all brands to look at for quality. They are contractor grade. I actually have a Kawasaki drill that has been great for me - but not sure they make anything good for masonry.

    I have had the same 18V Ryobi tools for at least 20 years, I upgraded a few to get a hammer drill and Drill Driver and I upgraded to the newer Lithium batteries that last forever, but the same batteries fit the same tools.

    I was so happy with the Ryobi smaller tools I switched over to the 40V grass trimmer and hedge trimmer, I have worn out one drill in all that time.


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    Good day :)