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Bits to Atoms: Building an 'Evil Dead' Chainsaw

Evil Dead 2 is one of my favorite movies of all-time; one that I may have bought more times than even Star Wars. (I own it on Betamax!) My wife even took me to the site of the original Evil Dead cabin near her home in Tennessee. For those who have not experienced this gem, at a pivotal moment in the film, Ash, played the amazing Bruce Campbell, replaces his severed hand (which he cut off because it was possessed) with a chainsaw. He then uses said chainsaw to saw off the barrel of his shotgun, holsters it and as the camera zooms in, proclaims, ‘groovy!’. Instant classic.

My original chainsaw with fabricated top.

About three years ago, I find myself at the grocery store and look at a jug of Arizona Ice Tea. My brain connects the dots and I decided that it looked like the base of a chainsaw, which lead to me building an Evil Dead 2 chainsaw replica for Halloween. Unfortunately, that was also the same year Hurricane Sandy hit New York, so we were evacuated and Halloween was cancelled. But the year after that, I am even more ready with an exact costume that’s weathered and bloodied…and I get one of the worst colds ever which cancels Halloween again. Mark my words--this is the year that I will finally get to use my Evil Dead 2 chainsaw--and maybe you can too!

The parts and tools needed to build your own Evil Dead 2 chainsaw are all actually pretty reasonable. A key piece is 3D printed--I’ve provided the files for download--and we’ll discuss alternatives if you don’t have access to a 3D printer. To start off, I captured a bunch of screengrabs from the film for reference, but the best photos I found were from the excellent Evil Dead Chainsaws site, which makes amazing replicas.

The original prop was based on an actual Homelite chainsaw that was heavily modified and cast in plastic and rubber so Bruce could fit his hand inside and use it safely. I tried to duplicate key aspects of the original for my first version, which required some light metal work for the top piece and 3D printing the distinctive side-grill. For the version I’m presenting here, I’ve simplified the parts and process while still producing a killer chainsaw replica.

Building a Custom Arcade Cabinet, Part 6

With the frame of the arcade cabinet constructed, Norm and Wes head back to the garage to begin the wiring of the buttons and other electronics. In this episode, we discuss the different types of custom arcade controls, the hardware to link them all together, and the tiny computer we're going to build to run the software. (This video series was brought to you by Premium memberships on Tested. Learn more about how you can support us by joining the Tested Premium community!)

Testing: The Moto 360 Android Wear Smartwatch

Android Wear was announced way back in March of 2014, but it wasn't until July that we could actually buy smartwatches running Google's wearable software. The LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live were capable watches, but they weren't jaw dropping in terms of their design--rectangular screens on a plastic band. These debut devices were perhaps best as demos of Android Wear--a hint of what was to come. Now the Motorola Moto 360 has arrived, and while it's still in short supply, units are slowly are slowly trickling out for excited Android fans.

The internet waited through six solid months of buildup for this device with its round LCD, but was it worth the wait? I've been using the Moto 360 every day for a month, having forsaken my G Watch, and have learned some interesting things about Motorola's latest wearable. Here's what you should know before you decide to slap one on your wrist.

The Screen is Great, and Not Just Because it's Round

The Moto 360's defining characteristic is the screen--it's round. All previous smartwatches (even those before Android Wear) have been square. Round LCDs have been rare throughout the history of mobile technology partially because they're harder to manufacture, but also because they aren't as usable in most cases. One notable example of the round screen was the Motorola Aura, a luxury feature phone released in 2008 for over $2000. We've come a long way.

The Moto 360's display is striking, with a beveled edge, clean lines, and narrow bezels. The resolution is 320x280, which is okay for a device that's 1.56-inches in diameter. If you stick it up next to your face, you can make out the pixels, but farther away you can't. The thing about the Moto 360's screen you might not know is that it's overall gorgeous. The resolution simply doesn't tell the whole story.

The LCD is gapless and right up next to the glass, giving the 360 almost perfect viewing angles. The colors are also vibrant by LCD standards. The 360's screen is very bright too. One of the failings of the LG G Watch is that the brightness is rather mediocre, even at maximum. That makes it a little tough to see outdoors, but the Moto 360 shines brightly. It even has an ambient light that automatically adjusts the brightness so you can see in indoors and out.

The light sensor brings us to the "flat tire." That's the internet euphemism for the slice missing from the display at the bottom. It's about 5mm tall and completely black. This is where the ambient light sensor peeks out, as well as the area where the display connects to the mainboard inside the watch. Motorola explains this was a necessary compromise to avoid having a larger bezel. I'll admit this is a bit off-putting at first, but you get used to it. Some watch faces don't take into account the gap, though, which makes it look worse.

The Arduboy Bracelet Plays Tetris
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The Arduboy is a pocket-sized computer that's as thin as a few credit cards but still has a screen and controls to play basic games like Tetris and Breakout via an AtMega328p running Arduino. While that device is still in development to be made for sale, its makers have also whipped up a digital bracelet running multiple .66-inch OLED screens running on a flexible circuit. The first prototype looks awesome and ripe with potential, so I'd love to see this turn into a customizable kit!

In Brief: GoPro Announces Hero4 Line of Action Cameras

Another year, another GoPro release (how many people actually upgrade every year?) This generation of the ubiquitous action cams builds on last year's strengths--more high-speed fps recording options and better 4K video. On the high end, the $500 GoPro Hero4 Black now shoots 4K video at 30fps (double that of the Hero3 Black), as well as 120fps at 1080p (and other resolution/framerate options). The $400 Hero Silver has the same recording capabilities of last year's Black edition, but now includes a touchscreen for viewfinding and control on the back. GoPro also now has a budget option in the $130 Hero, which can record 1080p at 30fps and is also waterproof. 120fps at 1080p is appealing, but I care more about the usability improvements. The controls have apparently been reworked for faster access to recording settings, and new night shooting modes add manual control to the camera shutter. We'll likely buy one for testing, but have not had the best experience using the GoPros for our own productions. For long videos like shooting Still Untitled podcasts, the GoPros have overheated a few times.

Norman
Behold The Eyes of Hitchcock

From the Criterion Collection, a supercut of actors gazing directly at the camera in Hitchcock films. Short clips looped in just the right way and extended to the edge of discomfort. Unsettling and beautiful! See more work from the editor of this montage here.

In Brief: FAA Begins Granting Production Companies Drone Waivers

Last Thursday, the FAA announced that it has begun granting video production companies exemptions to its unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) regulations. Six companies now have permission to use quadcopters and drones for production purposes, after convincing the FAA that their operations would meet a minimum standard for safety. Operators at these companies, for example, would hold private pilot certificates, keep the aerial systems within line of sight at all times, and keep flights restricted to designated "sterile areas" on set. The FAA would still have to inspect the aircraft before each flight, and nighttime aerial production is still prohibited. But this establishes a precedence and procedure for commercial companies to seek regulatory exemptions for drone flights with the FAA. 40 more requests are being considered, and the FAA is encouraging interested firms to work with their respective industry associations to create the appropriate safety manuals and operating procedures required for new exemptions. In other quadcopter news, DHL has begun a monthlong trial of autonomous aerial delivery of medicine and supplies to a sparsely populated island off the coast of Germany.

Norman
Announcing Tested: The Show!

Here's a short promo video we shot announcing our live stage show for YouTube subscribers. The important stuff: it'll be at 1PM on Saturday, October 25th, at San Francisco's historic Castro Theater. We'll all be there! More details here. Tickets are on sale now!

Google Play App Roundup: Weather Timeline, Anomaly Defenders, and Cardinal Quest 2

Another week has dawned, and you're probably wondering what's new in the Play Store. Surely everyone starts off the week wondering that same thing, and that's why the Google Play App Roundup exists. Just click the link to head right to Google Play.

This week we've got a new way to check the weather, the final chapter in a tower defense/offence franchise, and a roguelike game that's sure to get your pulse racing.

Weather Timeline

There are as many weather apps as there are clouds in the sky, but this one does things a little differently. Weather Timeline shows you the current conditions and forecast as a vertically scrollable timeline, and it has a slick Android L design that will work on all your pre-L devices.

You can set multiple locations in the app to be displayed as separate cards on the main screen. Tap on any of them to open the timeline. The top card will be the current conditions, but below that you get general information about the next hour, 48 hours, and week. This is just a glanceable snippet of info--the details are below that. Each day in the weekly forecast has its own card with high/low temperatures and a neat little animated weather icon. Tapping on any of them will open a timeline of approximate temperatures (the same is true for the current day card).

Up at the top of the timeline is a button to open the weather radar, which appears with a cool L-style wipe effect. The radar in Weather Timeline isn't the best I've ever seen, but it gets the job done. The map does use a floating action button to change the view type, which is a valid use case--some devs are going a little crazy with the action button.

The interface makes it very easy to quickly glance at the timeline and see what's coming up. In addition to the icons on each card, they are also color-coded. Yellow cards mean a sunny forecast, whereas blue ones indicate rain. The yellow cards also fade to gray on the timeline when the sun sets. This same color theme is carrier over to the home screen widgets, which are reasonably good. I'd like to see a few more options for layout and opacity.

One particularly neat feature in Weather Timeline is the Time Machine. The app is powered by forecast.io, which aggregates weather data and uses it to model future patterns. It's obviously not going to know for sure what the weather is going to be in six months or a year, but it can estimate based on past data points. Weather Timeline lets you zoom to any point in the next 20-ish years to see a probable forecast. This is mostly for fun, but you do get a sweet DeLorean animation when you activate Time Machine.

Weather Timeline is $0.99 in the Play Store, and I think it's worth checking out if you want a different kind of weather app. It has already gotten a few solid updates, and the dev is working on adding Android Wear support.

Show and Tell: The Useless Box Kit

For this week's Show and Tell, Norm assembles a kit of a machine he's always wanted: a useless box. Flip the switch on the box and all it does is turn itself off. Simple, yet mesmerizing. The kit of laser cut plastic and some basic electronics isn't difficult to put together, and makes for a great afternoon project.