Quantcast
Latest Stories
Building a Custom Arcade Cabinet, Part 5

We're getting close! In this fifth episode of our custom arcade cabinet build, Norm and John tackle some mistakes made in the original plywood cutting and then work together to assemble the cabinet frame. The challenge of finding a way to mount the heavy CRT monitor inside the chassis requires some problem solving and precise measurements, but this thing is finally starting to look like a real cocktail cabinet! (This video series was brought to you by Premium memberships on Tested. Learn more about how you can support us by joining the Tested Premium community!)

USB Type-C Will Carry Power, Data, and DisplayPort Video

If you're the kind of person that gets excited about new cable technologies, you're in good company. Although it'll be a while before we actually see the next spec of USB 3.1 cables in circulation, I'm genuinely giddy about the potential of the impending USB Type-C connector. Late last year, we heard that it was going to be a reversible design, which was confirmed in the USB Promoter Group and USB Implementer Forum's final specs for the next-gen plug. Today, VESA--the standards group in charge of video connector standards--announced that USB Type-C will also be able to carry native DisplayPort signals through a "DisplayPort Alternate Mode". Through this spec, DisplayPort signals on compatible monitors and accessories will be able to use up to four of the Type-C connector's high-speed data paths for video, alongside data and power already being channelled. This won't be a pared down version of DisplayPort, either, meaning Type-C will be able to work with DisplayPort conversion adapters as well, such as for HDMI 2.0 and DVI. This means that future laptops may not need separate USB, HDMI, DP, or even VGA ports, and could just use a slew of thin USB Type-C ports for all inputs and outputs. Anandtech has more technical details about how this spec works, and what it may mean for the future of mobile PCs.

Photo credit: Flickr user taylor90 via Creative Commons

Of course, all these design specs and certifications mean nothing if hardware manufacturers don't begin to support them in both accessory devices and computer systems. That's where Apple has a leg-up on USB--its Lightning cable is ubiquitous in the iOS and Mac ecosystem, and Apple computers are still the only place you can find native support for Intel's Thunderbolt. Let's get on it, PC OEMs!

In Brief: "Overhead" Car Camera Technology is Magical

Of all the new technology and consumer electronics gear we learned about last week (Kindles, GeForces, VR prototypes, digital cameras, etc), the thing that wowed me the most was perhaps a piece of tech that's already been around for a few years. I flew to LA for video shoots with Frank Ippolito and Oculus, and we rented a car for the trip. The car Hertz gave us (read: upsold) was an Infiniti QX56 SUV--a massive land shark that made me feel like Turtle from Entourage driving around VIPs. Infiniti's SUVs have a similar backup camera technology as other manufactures--something that's going to be standard soon--but also has a patented "Around View" camera monitoring tech that blew my mind. It takes video feeds from four cameras around the car, skewing and compositing them to make it look like you're looking at a camera floating about 10 feet above the car. It's one of those tricks that sounds simple once you understand how it works, and works so seamlessly that you can't help but wonder why nobody had come up with it before. Really inspired innovation that has a huge impact on the way I drove and parked that car. Props to Infiniti for coming up with it! (The video below shows off Around View in action.)

Norman
Octobot Doubles Its Speed with Webbed Arms

From the Foundation for Research & Technology's Institute of Computer Science: "Adding a soft silicone web to a small robotic octopus helps the machine hit the gas. The first robot shown propels itself by snapping shut rigid plastic legs. The second bot uses flexible silicone legs and moves at about the same speed. The third robot zips along faster, using silicone arms and a web that helps it push through water." Material science and animal biology come together in this robot's clever mimicking of an Octopus. Read more at Science News.

In Brief: Star Trek's Original Enterprise Model Gets Proper Restoration

For the past 13 years, one of science fiction television's more enduring icons has had a less-than-prominent home for public display. The original studio filming model of the Enterprise from Star Trek (not the motion picture refit) was mounted in front of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum's gift shop. The large wood prop actually spent several years hanging as part of a "Life in the Universe" exhibit in the Smithsonian's Art & Industries Building, but that method of display fractured the wooden frame of the ship, which was never meant to be hung from the ceiling. But the Enterprise is finally getting some respect--the Air and Space Museum announced that it has taken the model off of public view for an 18-month restoration (just in time for Star Trek's 50th anniversary!) and will have a new home in the Museum's ground floor, in the Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall. I've never actually seen this model in person, so time to start planning for a trip a year and a half from now!

Norman 2
Google Play App Roundup: Noyze Volume Panel, Goat Simulator, and daWindci Deluxe

An app might only cost a buck or two, but if you end up buying things that don't strike your fancy, that could add up to a lot of wasted money. It's best to go into the Play Store with some idea of what's a safe bet. That's what the Google Play App Roundup is here to do--it's the best new stuff every week. Just click on the app name to head to the Play Store and test it out yourself

This week there's a new volume control app, a game about being a Goat, and a lovely atmospheric puzzler.

Noyze Volume Panel

Android has had volume management apps since the very beginning as there is no support for a single hardware mute switch, a la the iPhone. Most of these apps rely on an app or widget that you have to find and use. Noyze Volume Panel is cool in that it plugs right into the hardware volume toggles to give you UI tweaks, quick access to multiple volume controls, and a few more neat features. Additionally, you don't need root access, just Android 4.3 or higher.

Setting up Noyze is a little more involved than most apps. Because it's plugging into a hardware feature, it needs to enabled as an accessibility service. The app will give you a link the the settings menu to enable it, but you'll also need notification access (another trip to the settings) for the full effect--more on that later. The default behavior of Noyze is that instead of the floating volume panel popup that most Android devices have, you'll get a clean volume overlay on the status bar when you change the volume.

The settings in Noyze are fairly extensive with a number of vastly different themes. You'll need to upgrade to the full version for $1.49 to get access to all of them, but the free ones are good too. Most of the themes are aping some other device or ROM like Paranoid Android (pictured here), iOS, or MIUI. A few are just different takes on standard Android controls. Several volume panel themes also come with built-in playback controls, which is actually really useful. This feature is also why you'll have to add Noyze to the notification service.

I also quite like that the foreground and accent colors can be changed to better match your system theme. The addition of a custom time out is also much appreciated. Delving into the other settings areas is a good idea because this app is modifying a system function, which can cause some issues. For example, Noyze will pop up every time you take a screenshot with the volume down + power shortcut. Luckily, there's a setting to ignore long-presses of the volume buttons. You can also link together all your individual volumes and assign app shortcuts to a long-press of the up or down toggle. I'm not saying the developer thought of everything, but he thought of a lot.

There is no discernable lag on any of the devices I've tested Noyze on, but it was a little reluctant to start on one or two until I had fully restarted. There is a helper notification that can be enabled in the settings to make sure the app isn't closed in the background, but a device with 2GB of RAM or more shouldn't have an issue. Even if you don't need the additional features of the pro version, Noyze is a capable app with no ads.

Hands-On with Oculus Rift "Crescent Bay" Prototype Virtual Reality Headset

Norm goes to Oculus Connect to get a hands-on demo of the new "Crescent Bay" feature prototype of the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset. We interview Nate Mitchell and Palmer Luckey of Oculus VR to talk about what's new in the headset, reveal some technical specifications, and then walk through the entire demo experience--with 1080p video from the private demo room!

Norm Drinks Soylent, Day 7

The final day of Norm's Soylent challenge is upon us! We actually skipped a day of updates yesterday, so this final video recaps Norm's psychological state at the end of his diet week and shows you what his first real meals are after the challenge! To congratulate Norm in his new healthy living initiative, sign up for a Tested Premium Membership by clicking here.

Three Amazing Games I Played At XOXO Last Weekend

If you listened to this week's edition of This Is Only a Test, you know that I was in Portland last week for the XOXO Festival. XOXO is a gathering of interesting makers of all types, from game developers to filmmakers to engineers to sculptors and more. Over the weekend, I got to meet dozens of fascinating folks from around the world. (The talks will be online in coming weeks, and I'll post the ones that were particularly relevant to Tested readers on the site as they come online.)

The daytime talks are really only half of what XOXO is about though. This year, I spent much more time at the evening events dedicated to videogames and board games. While there, I played a bunch of awesome games, but I spent the most time with three that I think you should really keep an eye out for. Follow their makers on Twitter, and if they end up at an indie festival or an arcade expo near you, go play them. You'll thank me later.